PSCI398 - Can China Stop Climate Change?

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
307
Title (text only)
Can China Stop Climate Change?
Term
2022A
Syllabus URL
Subject area
PSCI
Section number only
307
Section ID
PSCI398307
Course number integer
398
Meeting times
M 01:45 PM-04:45 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Scott Michael Moore
Description
Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one course may be taken in a given semester. Recent titles have included: Sustainable Environmental Policy & Global Politics; Shakespeare and Political Theory.
Course number only
398
Use local description
No

PSCI405 - Media, Pub Opinion, Glo

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Media, Pub Opinion, Glo
Term
2022A
Subject area
PSCI
Section number only
401
Section ID
PSCI405401
Course number integer
405
Meeting times
M 05:15 PM-08:15 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Diana C Mutz
Description
This seminar will examine American attitudes toward globalization and the role of the media in shaping public opinion toward events and people beyond our borders. Students will participate in original research on attitudes toward issues tied to globalization such as immigration, international trade, support for international organizations, isolationsim and so forth. Students will also spend time systematically studying the implications of American media coverage of these issues.
Course number only
405
Cross listings
COMM405401
Use local description
No

PSCI990 - Masters Thesis

Status
O
Activity
MST
Section number integer
1
Title (text only)
Masters Thesis
Term
2022A
Subject area
PSCI
Section number only
001
Section ID
PSCI990001
Course number integer
990
Registration notes
Permission Needed From Department
Level
graduate
Description
Master's Thesis course.
Course number only
990
Use local description
No

PSCI798 - American Institutions

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
301
Title (text only)
American Institutions
Term
2022A
Subject area
PSCI
Section number only
301
Section ID
PSCI798301
Course number integer
798
Registration notes
Undergraduates Need Permission
Meeting times
R 01:45 PM-04:45 PM
Level
graduate
Instructors
Daniel Q Gillion
Description
Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one section may be given in a semester. Recent titles have included: Interpreting the Canon; State, Self, & Society; U.S. Policy in Europe; and Dissertation Writing.
Course number only
798
Use local description
No

PSCI582 - Gender,Power&Fem Theory

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Gender,Power&Fem Theory
Term
2022A
Syllabus URL
Subject area
PSCI
Section number only
401
Section ID
PSCI582401
Course number integer
582
Meeting times
W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM
Level
graduate
Instructors
Nancy J. Hirschmann
Description
This seminar will examine the theme of power as it engages questions of sex and gender. Subsidiary themes that will be developed over the course of the semester include: the modernism/ postmodernism debate as it particularly relates to feminism; the intersectionality of race, gender, sexuality and class and how feminists can and do talk about "women"; the relevance of feminist theory to policy issues, and which theoretical approaches are the most appropriate or have the most powerful potential. The readings will start with "foundational" texts in feminist theory-- texts that anyone who wants to work in or teach feminist theory needs to have in their repertoire, they set out the background and history of contemporary feminist theory, and they operate from a variety of disciplinary frameworks. We then will move onto some newer scholarship and some more specific political issues and topics, depending on what students in the course are interested in studying. This course is open to undergraduates who have had some prior course work in feminist theory, gender and sexuality studies, and/or political theory, in consultation with the professor.
Course number only
582
Cross listings
GSWS582401
Use local description
No

PSCI535 - Inequality & Race Policy

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Inequality & Race Policy
Term
2022A
Subject area
PSCI
Section number only
401
Section ID
PSCI535401
Course number integer
535
Registration notes
Undergraduates Need Permission
Meeting times
T 01:45 PM-04:45 PM
Level
graduate
Instructors
Daniel Q Gillion
Course number only
535
Cross listings
AFRC524401
Use local description
No

PSCI517 - Russian Politics

Status
O
Activity
REC
Section number integer
404
Title (text only)
Russian Politics
Term
2022A
Subject area
PSCI
Section number only
404
Section ID
PSCI517404
Course number integer
517
Registration notes
Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
Meeting times
F 01:45 PM-02:45 PM
Level
graduate
Description
This course will present an in-depth examination of political, economic and social change in post-Soviet Russia within a historical context. After a breif discussion of contemporary problems in Russia, the first half of the course will delve into the rise of communism in 1917, the evolution of the Soviet regime, and the tensions between ideology and practice over the seventy years of communist rule up until 1985. The second part of the course will begin with an examination of the Gorbachev period and the competing interpretations of how the events between 1985 and 1991 may have contributed to the collapse of the Soviet Union. We will then proceed to make sense of the continuities and changes in politics, economics and society in contemporary Russia. Important topics will include the confrontations accompanying the adoption of a new constitution, the emergence of competing ideologies and parties, the struggle over economic privatization, the question of federalism and nationalism, social and political implicatons of economic reform, and prospects for Russia's future in the post-Yeltsin era. This course may also be taken as a graduate seminar (PSCI 517) with the permission of the instructor and the completion of additional requirements.
Course number only
517
Cross listings
REES217404, PSCI217404
Fulfills
Cross Cultural Analysis
Use local description
No

PSCI517 - Russian Politics

Status
O
Activity
REC
Section number integer
403
Title (text only)
Russian Politics
Term
2022A
Subject area
PSCI
Section number only
403
Section ID
PSCI517403
Course number integer
517
Registration notes
Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
Meeting times
F 10:15 AM-11:15 AM
Level
graduate
Description
This course will present an in-depth examination of political, economic and social change in post-Soviet Russia within a historical context. After a breif discussion of contemporary problems in Russia, the first half of the course will delve into the rise of communism in 1917, the evolution of the Soviet regime, and the tensions between ideology and practice over the seventy years of communist rule up until 1985. The second part of the course will begin with an examination of the Gorbachev period and the competing interpretations of how the events between 1985 and 1991 may have contributed to the collapse of the Soviet Union. We will then proceed to make sense of the continuities and changes in politics, economics and society in contemporary Russia. Important topics will include the confrontations accompanying the adoption of a new constitution, the emergence of competing ideologies and parties, the struggle over economic privatization, the question of federalism and nationalism, social and political implicatons of economic reform, and prospects for Russia's future in the post-Yeltsin era. This course may also be taken as a graduate seminar (PSCI 517) with the permission of the instructor and the completion of additional requirements.
Course number only
517
Cross listings
REES217403, PSCI217403
Fulfills
Cross Cultural Analysis
Use local description
No

PSCI517 - Russian Politics

Status
O
Activity
REC
Section number integer
402
Title (text only)
Russian Politics
Term
2022A
Subject area
PSCI
Section number only
402
Section ID
PSCI517402
Course number integer
517
Registration notes
Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
Meeting times
W 07:00 PM-08:00 PM
Level
graduate
Description
This course will present an in-depth examination of political, economic and social change in post-Soviet Russia within a historical context. After a breif discussion of contemporary problems in Russia, the first half of the course will delve into the rise of communism in 1917, the evolution of the Soviet regime, and the tensions between ideology and practice over the seventy years of communist rule up until 1985. The second part of the course will begin with an examination of the Gorbachev period and the competing interpretations of how the events between 1985 and 1991 may have contributed to the collapse of the Soviet Union. We will then proceed to make sense of the continuities and changes in politics, economics and society in contemporary Russia. Important topics will include the confrontations accompanying the adoption of a new constitution, the emergence of competing ideologies and parties, the struggle over economic privatization, the question of federalism and nationalism, social and political implicatons of economic reform, and prospects for Russia's future in the post-Yeltsin era. This course may also be taken as a graduate seminar (PSCI 517) with the permission of the instructor and the completion of additional requirements.
Course number only
517
Cross listings
REES217402, PSCI217402
Fulfills
Cross Cultural Analysis
Use local description
No

PSCI517 - Russian Politics

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Russian Politics
Term
2022A
Subject area
PSCI
Section number only
401
Section ID
PSCI517401
Course number integer
517
Registration notes
Undergraduates Need Permission
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
Meeting times
MW 05:15 PM-06:15 PM
Level
graduate
Instructors
Rudra Sil
Description
This course will present an in-depth examination of political, economic and social change in post-Soviet Russia within a historical context. After a breif discussion of contemporary problems in Russia, the first half of the course will delve into the rise of communism in 1917, the evolution of the Soviet regime, and the tensions between ideology and practice over the seventy years of communist rule up until 1985. The second part of the course will begin with an examination of the Gorbachev period and the competing interpretations of how the events between 1985 and 1991 may have contributed to the collapse of the Soviet Union. We will then proceed to make sense of the continuities and changes in politics, economics and society in contemporary Russia. Important topics will include the confrontations accompanying the adoption of a new constitution, the emergence of competing ideologies and parties, the struggle over economic privatization, the question of federalism and nationalism, social and political implicatons of economic reform, and prospects for Russia's future in the post-Yeltsin era. This course may also be taken as a graduate seminar (PSCI 517) with the permission of the instructor and the completion of additional requirements.
Course number only
517
Cross listings
REES217401, PSCI217401
Fulfills
Cross Cultural Analysis
Use local description
No