Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
PSCI 0100-001 Introduction to Comparative Politics Guy Grossman MW 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course is designed to introduce students to comparative political analysis. How can the political behavior, circumstances, institutions, and dynamic patterns of change that people experience in very different societies be analyzed using the same set of concepts and theories? Key themes include nationalism, political culture, democratization, authoritarianism, and the nature of protracted conflict. Society Sector
PSCI 0100-202 Introduction to Comparative Politics W 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course is designed to introduce students to comparative political analysis. How can the political behavior, circumstances, institutions, and dynamic patterns of change that people experience in very different societies be analyzed using the same set of concepts and theories? Key themes include nationalism, political culture, democratization, authoritarianism, and the nature of protracted conflict. Society Sector
PSCI 0100-203 Introduction to Comparative Politics W 5:15 PM-6:14 PM This course is designed to introduce students to comparative political analysis. How can the political behavior, circumstances, institutions, and dynamic patterns of change that people experience in very different societies be analyzed using the same set of concepts and theories? Key themes include nationalism, political culture, democratization, authoritarianism, and the nature of protracted conflict. Society Sector
PSCI 0100-204 Introduction to Comparative Politics R 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course is designed to introduce students to comparative political analysis. How can the political behavior, circumstances, institutions, and dynamic patterns of change that people experience in very different societies be analyzed using the same set of concepts and theories? Key themes include nationalism, political culture, democratization, authoritarianism, and the nature of protracted conflict. Society Sector
PSCI 0100-205 Introduction to Comparative Politics R 5:15 PM-6:14 PM This course is designed to introduce students to comparative political analysis. How can the political behavior, circumstances, institutions, and dynamic patterns of change that people experience in very different societies be analyzed using the same set of concepts and theories? Key themes include nationalism, political culture, democratization, authoritarianism, and the nature of protracted conflict. Society Sector
PSCI 0100-206 Introduction to Comparative Politics F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is designed to introduce students to comparative political analysis. How can the political behavior, circumstances, institutions, and dynamic patterns of change that people experience in very different societies be analyzed using the same set of concepts and theories? Key themes include nationalism, political culture, democratization, authoritarianism, and the nature of protracted conflict. Society Sector
PSCI 0100-207 Introduction to Comparative Politics F 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is designed to introduce students to comparative political analysis. How can the political behavior, circumstances, institutions, and dynamic patterns of change that people experience in very different societies be analyzed using the same set of concepts and theories? Key themes include nationalism, political culture, democratization, authoritarianism, and the nature of protracted conflict. Society Sector
PSCI 0100-208 Introduction to Comparative Politics F 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course is designed to introduce students to comparative political analysis. How can the political behavior, circumstances, institutions, and dynamic patterns of change that people experience in very different societies be analyzed using the same set of concepts and theories? Key themes include nationalism, political culture, democratization, authoritarianism, and the nature of protracted conflict. Society Sector
PSCI 0100-209 Introduction to Comparative Politics F 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course is designed to introduce students to comparative political analysis. How can the political behavior, circumstances, institutions, and dynamic patterns of change that people experience in very different societies be analyzed using the same set of concepts and theories? Key themes include nationalism, political culture, democratization, authoritarianism, and the nature of protracted conflict. Society Sector
PSCI 0100-210 Introduction to Comparative Politics F 5:15 PM-6:14 PM This course is designed to introduce students to comparative political analysis. How can the political behavior, circumstances, institutions, and dynamic patterns of change that people experience in very different societies be analyzed using the same set of concepts and theories? Key themes include nationalism, political culture, democratization, authoritarianism, and the nature of protracted conflict. Society Sector
PSCI 0200-001 Introduction to American Politics Marc N. Meredith TR 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector
PSCI 0200-202 Introduction to American Politics R 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector
PSCI 0200-203 Introduction to American Politics R 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector
PSCI 0200-204 Introduction to American Politics R 5:15 PM-6:14 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector
PSCI 0200-205 Introduction to American Politics R 7:00 PM-7:59 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector
PSCI 0200-206 Introduction to American Politics F 8:30 AM-9:29 AM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector
PSCI 0200-207 Introduction to American Politics F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector
PSCI 0200-208 Introduction to American Politics F 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector
PSCI 0200-209 Introduction to American Politics F 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector
PSCI 0200-210 Introduction to American Politics F 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector
PSCI 0200-211 Introduction to American Politics R 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector
PSCI 0200-212 Introduction to American Politics R 5:15 PM-6:14 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector
PSCI 0200-213 Introduction to American Politics R 7:00 PM-7:59 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-001 Introduction to International Relations Edward D Mansfield MW 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-201 Introduction to International Relations Zoe Beth Jordan W 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-202 Introduction to International Relations Zoe Beth Jordan W 5:15 PM-6:14 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-203 Introduction to International Relations Zoe Beth Jordan R 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-204 Introduction to International Relations Kyilah Maria Terry R 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-205 Introduction to International Relations Kyilah Maria Terry R 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-206 Introduction to International Relations Kyilah Maria Terry R 5:15 PM-6:14 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-207 Introduction to International Relations CANCELED This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-208 Introduction to International Relations Nicolas-Alberto Idrobo-Rincon F 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-209 Introduction to International Relations Nicolas-Alberto Idrobo-Rincon F 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-210 Introduction to International Relations CANCELED This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-214 Introduction to International Relations CANCELED This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-215 Introduction to International Relations Nicolas-Alberto Idrobo-Rincon F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0600-401 Ancient Political Thought Jeffrey E. Green MW 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course aims to provide a broad survey of some of the most influential political thinkers and ideas from classical antiquity. Among the central figures to be examined are: Homer, Sophocles, Thucydides, Socrates, Plato, Diogenes, Aristotle, Epicurus, Cicero, Epictetus, Marcus Aurelius, Seneca, Jesus, and Augustine. Major themes include: ancient theories of justice (with special attention to the relation between the just state and the just person), the emergence of political philosophy as a distinct pursuit, the Athenian polis, the Roman republic and its demise, and the rise of Christianity. CLST1503401 History & Tradition Sector https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202430&c=PSCI0600401
PSCI 0600-402 Ancient Political Thought W 5:15 PM-6:14 PM This course aims to provide a broad survey of some of the most influential political thinkers and ideas from classical antiquity. Among the central figures to be examined are: Homer, Sophocles, Thucydides, Socrates, Plato, Diogenes, Aristotle, Epicurus, Cicero, Epictetus, Marcus Aurelius, Seneca, Jesus, and Augustine. Major themes include: ancient theories of justice (with special attention to the relation between the just state and the just person), the emergence of political philosophy as a distinct pursuit, the Athenian polis, the Roman republic and its demise, and the rise of Christianity. CLST1503402 History & Tradition Sector
PSCI 0600-403 Ancient Political Thought W 7:00 PM-7:59 PM This course aims to provide a broad survey of some of the most influential political thinkers and ideas from classical antiquity. Among the central figures to be examined are: Homer, Sophocles, Thucydides, Socrates, Plato, Diogenes, Aristotle, Epicurus, Cicero, Epictetus, Marcus Aurelius, Seneca, Jesus, and Augustine. Major themes include: ancient theories of justice (with special attention to the relation between the just state and the just person), the emergence of political philosophy as a distinct pursuit, the Athenian polis, the Roman republic and its demise, and the rise of Christianity. CLST1503403 History & Tradition Sector
PSCI 0600-404 Ancient Political Thought F 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course aims to provide a broad survey of some of the most influential political thinkers and ideas from classical antiquity. Among the central figures to be examined are: Homer, Sophocles, Thucydides, Socrates, Plato, Diogenes, Aristotle, Epicurus, Cicero, Epictetus, Marcus Aurelius, Seneca, Jesus, and Augustine. Major themes include: ancient theories of justice (with special attention to the relation between the just state and the just person), the emergence of political philosophy as a distinct pursuit, the Athenian polis, the Roman republic and its demise, and the rise of Christianity. CLST1503404 History & Tradition Sector
PSCI 0600-405 Ancient Political Thought F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course aims to provide a broad survey of some of the most influential political thinkers and ideas from classical antiquity. Among the central figures to be examined are: Homer, Sophocles, Thucydides, Socrates, Plato, Diogenes, Aristotle, Epicurus, Cicero, Epictetus, Marcus Aurelius, Seneca, Jesus, and Augustine. Major themes include: ancient theories of justice (with special attention to the relation between the just state and the just person), the emergence of political philosophy as a distinct pursuit, the Athenian polis, the Roman republic and its demise, and the rise of Christianity. CLST1503405 History & Tradition Sector
PSCI 0601-601 Modern Political Thought Yara Damaj T 5:15 PM-8:14 PM This course will provide an overview of major figures and themes of modern political thought. We will focus on themes and questions pertinent to political theory in the modern era, particularly focusing on the relationship of the individual to community, society, and state. Although the emergence of the individual as a central moral, political, and conceptual category arguably began in earlier eras, it is in the seventeenth century that it takes firm hold in defining the state, political institutions, moral thinking, and social relations. The centrality of "the individual" has created difficulties, even paradoxes, for community and social relations, and political theorists have struggled to reconicle those throughout the modern era. We will consider the political forms that emerged out of those struggles, as well as the changed and distinctly "modern" conceptualizations of political theory such as freedom, responsibilty, justice, rights and obligations, as central categories for organizing moral and political life. History & Tradition Sector
PSCI 1102-001 Global Development: Data, Politics and Practice Erik Wibbels TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Why are some countries rich and some poor? Why are some households rich and some poor? This course introduces students to the intellectual tools for understanding why development varies across the globe and the practical tools for designing and evaluating policies aimed at alleviating poverty. To that end, the course is organized into three parts. The first part focuses on the big picture: the macroeconomic and political foundations for sustained economic growth, including historical legacies, technological innovation and political institutions. The second part focuses on the micro-picture: the household-level dynamics of poverty and development, including access to food and credit, the role of health and education, the transition from village to city life, and day-to-day governance. The third part of the course introduces students to the practicalities of designing and evaluating the efficacy of governance and poverty relief interventions and policies. The focus will be on the use of field experiments to study interventions to promote better governance and household wellbeing.
PSCI 1202-001 Changing American Electorate Daniel Jacob Hopkins MW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM In 1960, a Democratic candidate won a very narrow Presidential victory with just 100,000 votes; in 2000, the Democratic candidate lost but received 500,000 more votes than his opponent. Still, contemporary scholars and journalists have made a variety of arguments about just how much the American political landscape changed in the intervening 40 years, often calling recent decades a transformation. This course explores and critically evaluates those arguments. Key questions include: how, if at all, have Americans political attitudes and ideologies changed? How have their connections to politics changed? What has this meant for the fortunes and strategies of the two parties? How have the parties' base voters and swing voters changed? What changes in American society have advantaged some political messages and parties at the expense of others? Focusing primarily on mass-level politics, we consider a wide range of potential causes, including the role of race in American politics, suburbanization, economic transformations, the evolving constellation and structure of interest groups, declining social capital, the changing role of religion, immigration, and the actions of parties and political elites. For three weeks in the semester, we will take a break from considering broader trends to look at specific elections in some depth. Quantitative Data Analysis https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202430&c=PSCI1202001
PSCI 1202-202 Changing American Electorate Elizabeth Ariel Stark W 3:30 PM-4:29 PM In 1960, a Democratic candidate won a very narrow Presidential victory with just 100,000 votes; in 2000, the Democratic candidate lost but received 500,000 more votes than his opponent. Still, contemporary scholars and journalists have made a variety of arguments about just how much the American political landscape changed in the intervening 40 years, often calling recent decades a transformation. This course explores and critically evaluates those arguments. Key questions include: how, if at all, have Americans political attitudes and ideologies changed? How have their connections to politics changed? What has this meant for the fortunes and strategies of the two parties? How have the parties' base voters and swing voters changed? What changes in American society have advantaged some political messages and parties at the expense of others? Focusing primarily on mass-level politics, we consider a wide range of potential causes, including the role of race in American politics, suburbanization, economic transformations, the evolving constellation and structure of interest groups, declining social capital, the changing role of religion, immigration, and the actions of parties and political elites. For three weeks in the semester, we will take a break from considering broader trends to look at specific elections in some depth. Quantitative Data Analysis
PSCI 1202-203 Changing American Electorate Elizabeth Ariel Stark W 5:15 PM-6:14 PM In 1960, a Democratic candidate won a very narrow Presidential victory with just 100,000 votes; in 2000, the Democratic candidate lost but received 500,000 more votes than his opponent. Still, contemporary scholars and journalists have made a variety of arguments about just how much the American political landscape changed in the intervening 40 years, often calling recent decades a transformation. This course explores and critically evaluates those arguments. Key questions include: how, if at all, have Americans political attitudes and ideologies changed? How have their connections to politics changed? What has this meant for the fortunes and strategies of the two parties? How have the parties' base voters and swing voters changed? What changes in American society have advantaged some political messages and parties at the expense of others? Focusing primarily on mass-level politics, we consider a wide range of potential causes, including the role of race in American politics, suburbanization, economic transformations, the evolving constellation and structure of interest groups, declining social capital, the changing role of religion, immigration, and the actions of parties and political elites. For three weeks in the semester, we will take a break from considering broader trends to look at specific elections in some depth. Quantitative Data Analysis
PSCI 1202-204 Changing American Electorate CANCELED In 1960, a Democratic candidate won a very narrow Presidential victory with just 100,000 votes; in 2000, the Democratic candidate lost but received 500,000 more votes than his opponent. Still, contemporary scholars and journalists have made a variety of arguments about just how much the American political landscape changed in the intervening 40 years, often calling recent decades a transformation. This course explores and critically evaluates those arguments. Key questions include: how, if at all, have Americans political attitudes and ideologies changed? How have their connections to politics changed? What has this meant for the fortunes and strategies of the two parties? How have the parties' base voters and swing voters changed? What changes in American society have advantaged some political messages and parties at the expense of others? Focusing primarily on mass-level politics, we consider a wide range of potential causes, including the role of race in American politics, suburbanization, economic transformations, the evolving constellation and structure of interest groups, declining social capital, the changing role of religion, immigration, and the actions of parties and political elites. For three weeks in the semester, we will take a break from considering broader trends to look at specific elections in some depth. Quantitative Data Analysis
PSCI 1205-401 Constitutional Law Dejah Ann Adams
Marci Ann Hamilton
TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This class introduces students to the United States Constitution, specifically Articles I, II, III, the Tenth Amendment, Equal Protection Clause, and the First Amendment. The format for each class will consist of a 45-minute lecture followed by small group discussions on assigned issues and questions. AFRC1205401 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
PSCI 1207-402 Who Gets Elected and Why? The Science of Politics Elizabeth Marie Burdett
Edward G Rendell
M 5:15 PM-8:14 PM What does it take to get elected to office? What are the key elements of a successful political campaign? What are the crucial issues guiding campaigns and elections in the U.S. at the beginning of the 21st century? This class will address the process and results of electoral politics at the local, state, and federal levels. Course participants will study the stages and strategies of running for public office and will discuss the various influences on getting elected, including: Campaign finance and fundraising, demographics, polling, the media, staffing, economics, and party organization. Each week we will be joined by guest speakers who are nationally recognized professionals, with expertise in different areas of the campaign and election process. Students will also analyze campaign case studies and the career of the instructor himself. Edward G. Rendell is the former Mayor of Philadelphia, former Chair of the Democratic National Committee, and former Governor of Pennsylvania. URBS3200401
PSCI 1210-401 Introduction to Political Communication Kathleen Hall Jamieson
Shawn Thomas Patterson
M 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This course is an introduction to the field of political communication and conceptual approaches to analyzing communication in various forms, including advertising, speech making, campaign debates, and candidates' and office-holders' uses of social media and efforts to frame news. The focus of this course is on the interplay in the U.S. between media and politics. The course includes a history of campaign practices from the 1952 presidential contest through the election of 2020. COMM2260401
PSCI 1292-001 Asian American Politics TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Asian Americans are the fastest growing racial minority group in the United States – what are the varied ways Asian Americans have been engaging in politics and how have they shaped the terrain of American politics? This course will survey the different facets of political life in Asian American communities, focusing on three major themes. First, we will examine the origins and evolution of “Asian America” as a political project. Second, we will explore how Asian Americans have been engaging in a variety of political arenas, from electoral politics to community organizing. We will consider topics such as voting, political representation, and grassroots activisms around gentrification, anti-Asian violence, and immigrant detention and deportation. Third, we will consider the politics of interminority relations; in other words, how Asian Americans engage with other communities of color. We will focus on the political and ethical questions around affirmative action, Black Lives Matter, and multi-racial solidarity. Throughout the course, we will grapple with the multiplicities and pluralities of Asian Americans, including both the limitations and possibilities of identity politics in a diversifying America. ASAM1900001
PSCI 1406-001 International Human Rights Eileen Doherty-Sil MW 5:15 PM-6:15 PM What exactly should be considered a fundamental "human right"? What is the basis for something is a fundamental human right? This course will examine not only broad conceptual debates, but will also focus on specific issue areas (e.g., civil rights, economic rights, women's rights), as well as the question of how new rights norms emerge in international relations.
PSCI 1406-202 International Human Rights R 10:15 AM-11:14 AM What exactly should be considered a fundamental "human right"? What is the basis for something is a fundamental human right? This course will examine not only broad conceptual debates, but will also focus on specific issue areas (e.g., civil rights, economic rights, women's rights), as well as the question of how new rights norms emerge in international relations.
PSCI 1406-203 International Human Rights R 12:00 PM-12:59 PM What exactly should be considered a fundamental "human right"? What is the basis for something is a fundamental human right? This course will examine not only broad conceptual debates, but will also focus on specific issue areas (e.g., civil rights, economic rights, women's rights), as well as the question of how new rights norms emerge in international relations.
PSCI 1406-204 International Human Rights R 1:45 PM-2:44 PM What exactly should be considered a fundamental "human right"? What is the basis for something is a fundamental human right? This course will examine not only broad conceptual debates, but will also focus on specific issue areas (e.g., civil rights, economic rights, women's rights), as well as the question of how new rights norms emerge in international relations.
PSCI 1406-205 International Human Rights R 3:30 PM-4:29 PM What exactly should be considered a fundamental "human right"? What is the basis for something is a fundamental human right? This course will examine not only broad conceptual debates, but will also focus on specific issue areas (e.g., civil rights, economic rights, women's rights), as well as the question of how new rights norms emerge in international relations.
PSCI 1406-206 International Human Rights R 5:15 PM-6:14 PM What exactly should be considered a fundamental "human right"? What is the basis for something is a fundamental human right? This course will examine not only broad conceptual debates, but will also focus on specific issue areas (e.g., civil rights, economic rights, women's rights), as well as the question of how new rights norms emerge in international relations.
PSCI 1406-207 International Human Rights F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM What exactly should be considered a fundamental "human right"? What is the basis for something is a fundamental human right? This course will examine not only broad conceptual debates, but will also focus on specific issue areas (e.g., civil rights, economic rights, women's rights), as well as the question of how new rights norms emerge in international relations.
PSCI 1600-001 Contemporary Political Thought Roxanne L Euben TR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is intended as a general introduction to political theory since 1900. The theme for the Spring 2023 will be: Power and Politics, and the theorists examined will include Hannah Arendt, bell hooks, Michel Foucault, Bertrand de Jouvenel, and James C. Scott. Questions include: What is political power? How has it been exercised and by whom? Who should have power? Are power and violence inescapably intertwined? Do those without conventional political power understand and exercise power differently from those who traditionally wield it? How have technologies of surveillance and control by medical, psychiatric, computer and security experts altered where power is and how it operates? https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202430&c=PSCI1600001
PSCI 1600-202 Contemporary Political Thought R 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course is intended as a general introduction to political theory since 1900. The theme for the Spring 2023 will be: Power and Politics, and the theorists examined will include Hannah Arendt, bell hooks, Michel Foucault, Bertrand de Jouvenel, and James C. Scott. Questions include: What is political power? How has it been exercised and by whom? Who should have power? Are power and violence inescapably intertwined? Do those without conventional political power understand and exercise power differently from those who traditionally wield it? How have technologies of surveillance and control by medical, psychiatric, computer and security experts altered where power is and how it operates?
PSCI 1600-203 Contemporary Political Thought R 5:15 PM-6:14 PM This course is intended as a general introduction to political theory since 1900. The theme for the Spring 2023 will be: Power and Politics, and the theorists examined will include Hannah Arendt, bell hooks, Michel Foucault, Bertrand de Jouvenel, and James C. Scott. Questions include: What is political power? How has it been exercised and by whom? Who should have power? Are power and violence inescapably intertwined? Do those without conventional political power understand and exercise power differently from those who traditionally wield it? How have technologies of surveillance and control by medical, psychiatric, computer and security experts altered where power is and how it operates?
PSCI 1600-204 Contemporary Political Thought F 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course is intended as a general introduction to political theory since 1900. The theme for the Spring 2023 will be: Power and Politics, and the theorists examined will include Hannah Arendt, bell hooks, Michel Foucault, Bertrand de Jouvenel, and James C. Scott. Questions include: What is political power? How has it been exercised and by whom? Who should have power? Are power and violence inescapably intertwined? Do those without conventional political power understand and exercise power differently from those who traditionally wield it? How have technologies of surveillance and control by medical, psychiatric, computer and security experts altered where power is and how it operates?
PSCI 1600-205 Contemporary Political Thought F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is intended as a general introduction to political theory since 1900. The theme for the Spring 2023 will be: Power and Politics, and the theorists examined will include Hannah Arendt, bell hooks, Michel Foucault, Bertrand de Jouvenel, and James C. Scott. Questions include: What is political power? How has it been exercised and by whom? Who should have power? Are power and violence inescapably intertwined? Do those without conventional political power understand and exercise power differently from those who traditionally wield it? How have technologies of surveillance and control by medical, psychiatric, computer and security experts altered where power is and how it operates?
PSCI 1800-001 Introduction to Data Science Matthew Levendusky MW 9:00 AM-9:59 AM Understanding and interpreting large datasets is increasingly central in political and social science. From polling, to policing, to economic inequality, to international trade, knowing how to work with data will allow you to shed light on a wide variety of substantive topics. This is a first course in a 4-course sequence that teaches students how to work with and analyze data. This class focuses on data acquisition, management, and visualization, the core skills needed to do data science. Leaving this course, students will be able to acquire, input, format, analyze, and visualize various types of political and social science data using the statistical programming language R. While no background in statistics or political science is required, students are expected to be generally familiar with contemporary computing environments (e.g. know how to use a computer) and have a willingness to learn a variety of data science tools. Leaving this class, students will be prepared to deepen their R skills in PSCI 3800, and then use their R skills to learn statistics in PSCI 1801 and 3801. They will also be ready to use their R skills in courses in other disciplines as well. Quantitative Data Analysis https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202430&c=PSCI1800001
PSCI 1800-202 Introduction to Data Science Matthew Levendusky
Nicholas Pangakis
R 10:15 AM-11:14 AM Understanding and interpreting large datasets is increasingly central in political and social science. From polling, to policing, to economic inequality, to international trade, knowing how to work with data will allow you to shed light on a wide variety of substantive topics. This is a first course in a 4-course sequence that teaches students how to work with and analyze data. This class focuses on data acquisition, management, and visualization, the core skills needed to do data science. Leaving this course, students will be able to acquire, input, format, analyze, and visualize various types of political and social science data using the statistical programming language R. While no background in statistics or political science is required, students are expected to be generally familiar with contemporary computing environments (e.g. know how to use a computer) and have a willingness to learn a variety of data science tools. Leaving this class, students will be prepared to deepen their R skills in PSCI 3800, and then use their R skills to learn statistics in PSCI 1801 and 3801. They will also be ready to use their R skills in courses in other disciplines as well. Quantitative Data Analysis https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202430&c=PSCI1800202
PSCI 1800-203 Introduction to Data Science Matthew Levendusky
Lauren Palladino
W 5:15 PM-6:14 PM Understanding and interpreting large datasets is increasingly central in political and social science. From polling, to policing, to economic inequality, to international trade, knowing how to work with data will allow you to shed light on a wide variety of substantive topics. This is a first course in a 4-course sequence that teaches students how to work with and analyze data. This class focuses on data acquisition, management, and visualization, the core skills needed to do data science. Leaving this course, students will be able to acquire, input, format, analyze, and visualize various types of political and social science data using the statistical programming language R. While no background in statistics or political science is required, students are expected to be generally familiar with contemporary computing environments (e.g. know how to use a computer) and have a willingness to learn a variety of data science tools. Leaving this class, students will be prepared to deepen their R skills in PSCI 3800, and then use their R skills to learn statistics in PSCI 1801 and 3801. They will also be ready to use their R skills in courses in other disciplines as well. Quantitative Data Analysis https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202430&c=PSCI1800203
PSCI 1800-204 Introduction to Data Science Matthew Levendusky
Lauren Palladino
W 7:00 PM-7:59 PM Understanding and interpreting large datasets is increasingly central in political and social science. From polling, to policing, to economic inequality, to international trade, knowing how to work with data will allow you to shed light on a wide variety of substantive topics. This is a first course in a 4-course sequence that teaches students how to work with and analyze data. This class focuses on data acquisition, management, and visualization, the core skills needed to do data science. Leaving this course, students will be able to acquire, input, format, analyze, and visualize various types of political and social science data using the statistical programming language R. While no background in statistics or political science is required, students are expected to be generally familiar with contemporary computing environments (e.g. know how to use a computer) and have a willingness to learn a variety of data science tools. Leaving this class, students will be prepared to deepen their R skills in PSCI 3800, and then use their R skills to learn statistics in PSCI 1801 and 3801. They will also be ready to use their R skills in courses in other disciplines as well. Quantitative Data Analysis https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202430&c=PSCI1800204
PSCI 1800-205 Introduction to Data Science Donald Moratz F 3:30 PM-4:29 PM Understanding and interpreting large datasets is increasingly central in political and social science. From polling, to policing, to economic inequality, to international trade, knowing how to work with data will allow you to shed light on a wide variety of substantive topics. This is a first course in a 4-course sequence that teaches students how to work with and analyze data. This class focuses on data acquisition, management, and visualization, the core skills needed to do data science. Leaving this course, students will be able to acquire, input, format, analyze, and visualize various types of political and social science data using the statistical programming language R. While no background in statistics or political science is required, students are expected to be generally familiar with contemporary computing environments (e.g. know how to use a computer) and have a willingness to learn a variety of data science tools. Leaving this class, students will be prepared to deepen their R skills in PSCI 3800, and then use their R skills to learn statistics in PSCI 1801 and 3801. They will also be ready to use their R skills in courses in other disciplines as well. Quantitative Data Analysis
PSCI 1800-206 Introduction to Data Science Matthew Levendusky
Lauren Palladino
W 8:30 PM-9:29 PM Understanding and interpreting large datasets is increasingly central in political and social science. From polling, to policing, to economic inequality, to international trade, knowing how to work with data will allow you to shed light on a wide variety of substantive topics. This is a first course in a 4-course sequence that teaches students how to work with and analyze data. This class focuses on data acquisition, management, and visualization, the core skills needed to do data science. Leaving this course, students will be able to acquire, input, format, analyze, and visualize various types of political and social science data using the statistical programming language R. While no background in statistics or political science is required, students are expected to be generally familiar with contemporary computing environments (e.g. know how to use a computer) and have a willingness to learn a variety of data science tools. Leaving this class, students will be prepared to deepen their R skills in PSCI 3800, and then use their R skills to learn statistics in PSCI 1801 and 3801. They will also be ready to use their R skills in courses in other disciplines as well. Quantitative Data Analysis
PSCI 1800-207 Introduction to Data Science Donald Moratz F 1:45 PM-2:44 PM Understanding and interpreting large datasets is increasingly central in political and social science. From polling, to policing, to economic inequality, to international trade, knowing how to work with data will allow you to shed light on a wide variety of substantive topics. This is a first course in a 4-course sequence that teaches students how to work with and analyze data. This class focuses on data acquisition, management, and visualization, the core skills needed to do data science. Leaving this course, students will be able to acquire, input, format, analyze, and visualize various types of political and social science data using the statistical programming language R. While no background in statistics or political science is required, students are expected to be generally familiar with contemporary computing environments (e.g. know how to use a computer) and have a willingness to learn a variety of data science tools. Leaving this class, students will be prepared to deepen their R skills in PSCI 3800, and then use their R skills to learn statistics in PSCI 1801 and 3801. They will also be ready to use their R skills in courses in other disciplines as well. Quantitative Data Analysis
PSCI 1801-001 Statistical Methods PSCI Marc Trussler MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course is designed as a follow-up to PSCI 1800. In that class students learn a great deal about how to work with individual data sets in R: cleaning, tidying, merging, describing and visualizing data. PSCI 1801 shifts focus to the ultimate goal of data science: making inferences about the world based on the small sample of data that we have. Using a methodology that emphasizes intuition and simulation over mathematics, this course will cover the key statistical concepts of probability, sampling, distributions, hypothesis testing, and covariance. The ultimate goal of the class is for students to have the knowledge and ability to perform, customize, and explain bivariate and multivariate regression. Students who have not taken PSCI-1800 should have basic familiarity with R, including working with vectors and matrices, basic summary statistics, visualizations, and for() loops.
Quantitative Data Analysis
PSCI 2200-301 Preparing for Policy Work in Washington Deirdre Martinez Designed to complement a policy internship, this two credit course will focus on content and skills that are likely to be useful in typical Washington offices. Students will develop literacy on the most pressing domestic policy topics and will work on writing and presentation skills. All students will participate in a public policy internship for at least ten hours a week.
PSCI 2210-301 Balance of Power in American Politics (PIW) Wendy Ginsberg How do the Constitution's checks and balances work in practice? And where are they not working? This course examines the fault lines between Washington's two most powerful institutions - Congress and the President - how they clash, and where they work together. Students learn how Congress and the President share and compete for power in lawmaking, spending, investigations, nominations, foreign policy, and impeachment. The course is designed to foster skills in formulating strategies for conducting policy in an environment of institutions competing for power.
PSCI 2211-301 The Mechanics of American Foreign Policy (PIW) The Trump Presidency has profoundly shifted America's role in the world and the way in which key institutions of foreign policy making are staffed and positioned to advance America's interests. The ascent of extreme nationalists and nationalism in other power centers in the world along with growing distrust in government and public institutions may have marked the close of the two-decade post 9/11 era. Indeed, the global COVID-19 pandemic and the ways in which actors across the international spectrum have responded (or failed to respond) has led many to question the assumptions inherent in the post-9/11 international order and has marked the beginning of a new era of competition, a return to great-power politics, and the diminishing power of traditional actors, systems, and ideals on the global stage. This course will provide students with an in-depth, practical analysis of foreign policy and foreign policy making, with a view from Washington. It will also provide a baseline global literacy, through the lens of emerging ideas, institutions, interests, and actors, and focus on a framework for understanding shifts already underway in how Washington views the world. We will utilize less traditional resources, and instead focus on practical and "real-world" course material as well as less traditional instruction methods - utilizing and analyzing the sources and resources that policy makers in Washington rely upon. These include long-form journalism, official government documents, hearings and Congressional debate, think tank products, and news sources. Students will have the opportunity to engage with a variety of guest-speakers, all of whom have held senior official and non-governmental roles in American foreign policy making and influencing. Guest speakers will provide unique insight into their own experiences at the highest levels of foreign policy making and advocacy, and offer guidance as to how to pursue careers in foreign policy, national security, and international development. In the past, guest speakers have included: Former Deputy Secretaries of State William Burns and Heather Higginbottom; Executive Director of the ONE Campaign; Former Director of Policy Planning at the State Department; Former Ambassadors, Senior Professional Staff from the House Committee on Foreign Affairs and Senate Foreign Relations Committee, former Assistant Secretary of Population, Refugees, and Migration, among others.
PSCI 2420-401 Diplomacy in the Americas - The Penn Model OAS Program (SNF Paideia Program Course) Catherine E.M. Bartch TR 4:30 PM-5:59 PM Diplomacy in the Americas is an academically based community-service course where students explore what it means to educate youth for global civic and political engagement. Students apply theoretical and pedagogical principles in curriculum design, classroom teaching, and collaborative learning with public high school students on the topics of Latin American politics and the role of the Organization of American States (OAS). Analyzing and strategizing like a diplomat and guided by theories of democracy and the other three OAS pillars of economic development, security, and human rights, students will collectively examine and propose solutions to the most pressing issues in the Americas. This course is also an SNF Paideia Program Course. LALS3020401 Cross Cultural Analysis https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202430&c=PSCI2420401
PSCI 3600-001 Democracy and Disagreement (SNF Paideia Program Course) Ian Macmullen TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM When and how can we justify using the power of the government to force our fellow citizens to follow rules with which they disagree? In attempting to answer this question, we will pay special attention to (1) the various different types and sources of political disagreement and (2) the role of deliberation and reason-giving in a democracy. Through reading and debating works of contemporary political theory and philosophy, this course should help you to reflect on some fundamental but easily neglected questions about your own civic attitudes and behavior. What beliefs underpin your political commitments, why do you hold those beliefs, and why do other people see things differently? What makes you so sure that you’re right and they’re wrong? How, if at all, should you try to change their minds? When, if ever, should you refrain from supporting legal prohibition of actions that you feel sure are morally wrong?
The course will be taught in a hybrid lecture/discussion format. Students will be expected to take a short quiz at the start of many class sessions and to write at least three short papers.
https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202430&c=PSCI3600001
PSCI 3800-001 Applied Data Science Stephen Scott Pettigrew MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Jobs in data science are quickly proliferating throughout nearly every industry in the American economy. The purpose of this class is to build the statistics, programming, and qualitative skills that are required to excel in data science. The substantive focus of the class will largely be on topics related to politics and elections, although the technical skills can be applied to any subject matter. Quantitative Data Analysis
PSCI 3802-001 Political Polling William Marble MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Political polls are a central feature of elections and are ubiquitously employed to understand and explain voter intentions and public opinion. This course will examine political polling by focusing on four main areas of consideration. First, what is the role of political polls in a functioning democracy? This area will explore the theoretical justifications for polling as a representation of public opinion. Second, the course will explore the business and use of political polling, including media coverage of polls, use by politicians for political strategy and messaging, and the impact polls have on elections specifically and politics more broadly. The third area will focus on the nuts and bolts of election and political polls, specifically with regard to exploring traditional questions and scales used for political measurement; the construction and considerations of likely voter models; measurement of the horserace; and samples and modes used for election polls. The course will additionally cover a fourth area of special topics, which will include exit polling, prediction markets, polling aggregation, and other topics. It is not necessary for students to have any specialized mathematical or statistical background for this course. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202430&c=PSCI3802001
PSCI 3992-001 How Washington Works (SNF Paideia Program Course) Ezekiel J Emanuel F 12:00 PM-4:00 PM Consult the political science department or Paideia program for detailed descriptions. More than one course make be taken in a given semester.
PSCI 4130-401 Oil to Diamonds: The Political Economy of Natural Resources in Africa Adewale Adebanwi
Iyone Agboraw
T 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This course examines the ways in which the processes of the extraction, refining, sale and use of natural resources – including oil and diamond – in Africa produce complex regional and global dynamics. We explore how values are placed on resources, how such values, the regimes of valuation, commodification and the social formations that are (re)produced by these regimes lead to cooperation and conflict in the contemporary African state, including in the relationships of resource-rich African countries with global powers. Specific cases will be examined against the backdrop of theoretical insights to encourage comparative analyses beyond Africa. Some audio-visual materials will be used to enhance the understanding of the political economy and sociality of natural resources. AFRC4500401, ANTH3045401, SOCI2904401
PSCI 4200-301 Political Psychology Michele Francine Margolis W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM How do campaign advertisements influence voters' perceptions and behavior? What roles do emotions play in politics? Do we all harbor some measure of racism, sexism, or homophobia, and what role do these stereotypes play in political behavior? How and why do ideologies form, and how does partisanship influence the way that voters understand the political world? How do people perceive threat, and what are the psychological consequences of terrorism? These questions, and many others, are the province of political psychology, an interdisciplinary field that uses experimental methods and theoretical ideas from psychology as tools to examine the world of politics. In this course, we will explore the role of human thought, emotion, and behavior in politics and examine the psychological origins of citizens' political beliefs and actions from a variety of perspectives. Most of the readings emphasize politics in the United States, though the field itself speaks to every aspect of political science.
PSCI 4203-301 The Future of Conservatism and the GOP: Radicalization, Renewal or Replacement (SNF Paideia Course) Deirdre Martinez CANCELED Students will explore both the roots and the evolution of conservative thought by engaging with readings and directly with the prominent leaders on the right. As this is election season we'll devote time to election news and results and consider the implications for the Republican Party.
PSCI 4897-301 Andrea Mitchell Center Undergraduate Research Seminar Jeffrey E. Green M 5:15 PM-8:14 PM The course is intended for Andrea Mitchell Centre Undergraduate Fellows to present their research ideas, share with the class progress on their ongoing projects, and receive constructive feedback from fellow students and the course instructor.
PSCI 4992-301 Free Speech and the First Amendment Tradition (SNF Paideia Program Course) Carlin P. Romano T 7:00 PM-9:59 PM Consult the political science department or Paideia program for detailed descriptions. More than one course make be taken in a given semester.
PSCI 4993-301 The Politics of the War on Drugs and the Opioid Epidemic: Street Crime and Suite Crime Marie Gottschalk W 12:00 PM-2:59 PM Consult the department for detailed descriptions or if you think the course could count toward a subfield other than American Politics. More than one course may be taken in a given semester. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202430&c=PSCI4993301
PSCI 4994-301 International Politics and the Arab-Israeli Conflict Ian Steven Lustick R 3:30 PM-6:29 PM Consult the department for detailed descriptions or if you think the course could count toward a subfield other than International Relations. More than one course may be taken in a given semester.
PSCI 4997-301 Political Science Honors Bess Davis T 12:00 PM-2:59 PM This is a mandatory seminar for all students planning to submit an honors thesis for the purpose of possibly earning distinction in Political Science upon graduation. The course is aimed at helping students identify a useful and feasible research question, become familiar with the relevant literatures and debates pertaining to that question, develop a basic understanding of what might constitute "good" and "original" research in different subfields, and set up a plan for conducting and presenting the research. The course is also aimed at building a community of like-minded student researchers, which can complement and enrich the honor student's individual experience of working one-on-one with a dedicated faculty thesis advisor. Students apply in the spring of their junior year for admissions to the honors program and enrollment in PSCI497.
PSCI 5200-301 Political Behavior & Public Opinion Matthew Levendusky T 8:30 AM-11:29 AM This course is designed to give advanced undergraduates and graduate students exposure to the literature on political behavior in American politics (the course is part of the departments graduate sequence in American politics). The course will cover both the classics of public opinion and political behavior from the Columbia, Michigan, and Rochester schools, as well as more current topics and debates in the literature. Topics include (but are not limited to) the early voting studies, the role of partisanship and polarization, the nature and origins of ideology, mass-elite interactions, heuristics and low information rationality, the nature of the survey response, campaign and media effects, framing effects, and the role of institutions in structuring behavior. Undergraduates are welcome in the class, but they should know that the class assumes familiarity with quantitative approaches to studying politics, and they should speak to the instructor before enrolling. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202430&c=PSCI5200301
PSCI 5400-301 Borders and Boundaries in International and Comparative Perspective Beth Ann Simmons W 3:30 PM-6:29 PM This research seminar is designed for graduate students and advanced undergraduates. It explores the meaning and consequences of borders and boundaries in international relations. How do borders, border regions, and border activities speak to national encounters with neighbors and the rest of the world? How do international borders influence war and peace between states? How do they affect international trade and development? When and how are international borders “securitized,” and how does this affect the flow of goods, people, and illicit activities around and across the border? How do states cooperate across international borders? While this course is designed primarily as a seminar in international relations, we will examine the meaning and function of boundary-making between states from multiple perspectives. Borders, border regions and border crossings have multiple significance as designations of state authority, security buffers, expressions of social meaning and opportunities for economic integration. As a seminar designed primarily to stimulate research ideas, this course will be concerned with historical and current problems relating to international borders around the world. We will concentrate on formulating interesting research questions, bringing data to bear on specific hypotheses, becoming familiar with data sources, and designing our own research. All assignments are related to developing research skills; there are no in-class exams. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202430&c=PSCI5400301
PSCI 5401-640 Human Rights Eileen Doherty-Sil T 5:15 PM-7:55 PM This course will examine the theoretical, historical and political foundations of contemporary human rights debates. The course will cover not only broad conceptual issues, but also specific issue areas (e.g., civil rights, economic rights, women's rights, business and human rights), as well as the question of how new rights norms emerge and diffuse in the international arena. Undergraduates are not permitted.
PSCI 5685-301 Modern Islamic Political Thought Roxanne L Euben T 1:45 PM-4:44 PM The study of modern and contemporary political theory tends to focus on European and American thinkers. By contrast, this seminar is an advanced, reading-intensive course focused on modern and contemporary Islamic political thought. Topics and concepts covered include Muslim philosophies of history; critiques of Western imperialism; the relation between reason and revelation; the status of women; travel and knowledge; democracy and sovereignty; jihad and violence; what it means to be a Western Muslim; what the War on Terror means to American Muslims; and what makes a thinker or book “Islamic.” The course has three goals: 1) to introduce students to a rich tradition of political thought beyond the Euro-American canon of political theory; 2) to critically analyze some of the most important ideas, debates, and dilemmas that characterize modern and contemporary Islamic political thought; and 3) to engage with major figures from the recent history of Islamic political thought on as close to their own terms as possible, with an eye toward understanding their continuing political significance.
Advanced undergraduates require instructor permission.
PSCI 5800-301 Game Theory Alexander R Weisiger WF 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course provides an introduction to non-cooperative game theory and its applications to political science. The goal of the course is to provide students with the background and understanding necessary to read published game-theoretic work in political science journals. To that end, the course covers the basic concepts of game theory, including Nash equilibrium and its main refinements, simultaneous and sequential games, repeated games, evolutionary game theory, and games of incomplete and private information. In addition, we will cover some of the central models used in political science, notably models of public choice (such as the median voter theorem) and models of bargaining. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202430&c=PSCI5800301
PSCI 5991-301 Authoritarian Politics Jane Esberg W 12:00 PM-2:59 PM Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one course may be taken in a given semester. Recent titles have included: Race Development and American International Relations, Hegel and Marx, and Logic of the West.
PSCI 6100-301 Comparative Political Analysis Daniel Smith W 8:30 AM-11:29 AM This seminar is aimed primarily at graduate students planning to take doctoral exams in comparative politics. It provides a critical survey of the field of comparative politics, tracing the intellectual history of the field, examining shifts in conceptual frameworks and research traditions, and comparing alternative methodological approaches. The first half of the course generally examines how processes of political, economic, and social change have been theorized in the social sciences from the mid-19th century to the present. In this process, particular attention is paid to the bifurcation between theories that emphasize the "universal" (e.g. the homogenizing effects of specific processes or variables) and the "particular" (e.g. the persistence of distinctive historical legacies and trajectories). Since this bifurcation is reinforced by distinct styles and methods of research, the seminar also probes the recent battles between rational-choice, cultural, and structuralist scholars, while considering the trade-offs between varieties of formal, quantitative, and qualitative methods. In the second half, the focus shifts to the range of substantive problems investigated by scholars in the field of comparative politics. These topics cover the complex relations among nations, states and societies; the origins, consolidation, and patterns of democratic governance; political economy in relation to development processes and social policies; the intersection of international/global economy and domestic politics; the dynamics of revolutions and social movements; and alternative problematiques constructed from the point of view of real actors such as workers, women, and local communities. In all cases, As a whole, the course is designed to provide an introduction to important issues and debates that comparativists have regularly engaged in; to help you understand the assumptions behind, and differences between, particular approaches, methods, and styles of research; to examine whether current debates are spurring new or better research in a given field in light of past approaches; and to gauge whether there has been progress, fragmentation, or stagnation in the field of comparative politics as a whole.
PSCI 6350-401 Experimental Design and Issues in Causality Diana C Mutz T 1:45 PM-3:44 PM The main goal of this course is to familiarize students with experiments, quasi-experiments, survey experiments and field experiments as they are widely used in the social sciences. Some introductory level statistics background will be assumed, though this is a research design course, not a statistics course. By the end of the course, students will be expected to develop their own original experimental design that makes some original contribution to knowledge. Throughout the course of the semester, we will also consider how to deal with the issue of causality as it occurs in observational studies, and draw parallels to experimental research. COMM6150401
PSCI 6400-301 International Relations Theory Alexander R Weisiger R 8:30 AM-11:29 AM International Relations Theory is designed to prepare doctoral students for the political science comprehensive exam in international relations. The course focuses on the foundational concepts and theories used in the analysis of international relations (including both international security and international political economy), starting from power, anarchy, and realism, and moving through institutionalism, social constructivism, and domestic political approaches. Additional weeks of the course cover the history of the international relations discipline, the logic of inquiry in the social sciences, and fundamental topics in international relations including the causes of war, international order, international diplomacy, and the significance of public opinion for foreign policy. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202430&c=PSCI6400301
PSCI 6800-201 Advanced Statistical Analysis Jane Esberg
Donald Moratz
T 5:15 PM-6:14 PM The objective of this course is to provide Political Science Ph.D. students with statistical tools useful for making inferences about politics. We will cover fundamentals of probability theory, estimation, and hypothesis testing, emphasizing application to research questions in American Politics, positive Political Theory, Comparative Politics, and International Relations.
PSCI 6800-301 Advanced Statistical Analysis Jane Esberg M 1:45 PM-4:44 PM The objective of this course is to provide Political Science Ph.D. students with statistical tools useful for making inferences about politics. We will cover fundamentals of probability theory, estimation, and hypothesis testing, emphasizing application to research questions in American Politics, positive Political Theory, Comparative Politics, and International Relations.
PSCI 7800-301 Preparing a Disseration Prospectus Sarah Bush M 8:30 AM-11:29 AM The dissertation prospectus is a requirement for successfully completing the Ph.D. in political science. The goal of this class is to help students write a draft of a dissertation prospectus. To that end, we will cover what the components of a successful dissertation prospectus are, how to identify interesting and feasible research questions, and how to develop workable theoretical and/or empirical strategies for answering those questions. The course will also cover other
professional development topics that will be important for conducting many students’
dissertation research, including providing constructive feedback, working with mentors, applying for external funding, and conducting research with human subjects.
PSCI 7991-304 Topics in International Relations Edward D Mansfield T 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one section may be given in a semester. Recent titles have included: Interpreting the Canon; State, Self, & Society; U.S. Policy in Europe; and Dissertation Writing.