Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
PSCI 0010-301 America and Russia, Archetypes of Democracy and Autocracy? Daniel Jacob Hopkins BENN 24 M 1:45 PM-4:44 PM The primary goal of the first-year seminar program is to provide every first-year student with the opportunity for a direct personal encounter with a faculty member in a small class setting devoted to a significant intellectual endeavor. First-year seminars also fulfill College General Education Requirements. Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
Society Sector
PSCI 0010-302 Globalization Edward D Mansfield BENN 139 T 1:45 PM-4:44 PM The primary goal of the first-year seminar program is to provide every first-year student with the opportunity for a direct personal encounter with a faculty member in a small class setting devoted to a significant intellectual endeavor. First-year seminars also fulfill College General Education Requirements. Society Sector
Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
PSCI 0010-303 Government Censorship in Authoritarian Regimes Jane Esberg PCPE 203 T 3:30 PM-6:29 PM The primary goal of the first-year seminar program is to provide every first-year student with the opportunity for a direct personal encounter with a faculty member in a small class setting devoted to a significant intellectual endeavor. First-year seminars also fulfill College General Education Requirements. Society Sector
Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
PSCI 0200-001 Introduction to American Politics Michele Francine Margolis ANNS 110 TR 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=PSCI0200001
PSCI 0200-201 Introduction to American Politics Claire L Ma PCPE 203 R 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector
PSCI 0200-202 Introduction to American Politics Nicholas Pangakis PCPE 225 R 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector
PSCI 0200-203 Introduction to American Politics Nicholas Pangakis PCPE 225 R 5:15 PM-6:14 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector
PSCI 0200-204 Introduction to American Politics Nicholas Pangakis PCPE 225 R 7:00 PM-7:59 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector
PSCI 0200-205 Introduction to American Politics Lydia Orr PCPE 225 F 8:30 AM-9:29 AM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector
PSCI 0200-206 Introduction to American Politics Lydia Orr WILL 741 F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector
PSCI 0200-207 Introduction to American Politics Lydia Orr PCPE 225 F 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector
PSCI 0200-208 Introduction to American Politics Claire L Ma PCPE 225 F 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector
PSCI 0200-209 Introduction to American Politics Claire L Ma PCPE 225 F 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-001 Introduction to International Relations Edward D Mansfield STIT B6 MW 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=PSCI0400001
PSCI 0400-201 Introduction to International Relations Rithika Kumar PCPE 203 W 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-202 Introduction to International Relations Rithika Kumar PCPE 200 W 5:15 PM-6:14 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-203 Introduction to International Relations Rithika Kumar PWH 108 R 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-204 Introduction to International Relations Paul Silva LERN 102 R 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-205 Introduction to International Relations Paul Silva DRLB 4E9 R 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-206 Introduction to International Relations Paul Silva DRLB 4E9 R 5:15 PM-6:14 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-207 Introduction to International Relations CANCELED This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-208 Introduction to International Relations BENN 322 F 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-209 Introduction to International Relations WILL 741 F 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-210 Introduction to International Relations W 7:00 PM-7:59 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-211 Introduction to International Relations BENN 323 R 8:30 AM-9:29 AM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-212 Introduction to International Relations CANCELED This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-213 Introduction to International Relations CANCELED This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-214 Introduction to International Relations COLL 217 R 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0400-215 Introduction to International Relations DRLB 3W2 F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector
PSCI 0401-401 Russia and Eastern Europe in International Affairs Mitchell Orenstein WILL 723 TR 8:30 AM-9:59 AM Russia and the European Union (EU) are engaged in a battle for influence in Eastern Europe. EU foreign policy towards its Eastern neighbors is based on economic integration and the carrot of membership. With the application of this powerful incentive, Central and Southeastern European countries such as Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic, and Croatia have progressed rapidly towards integration with the EU (and NATO). Yet, given Russia's opposition to the further enlargement, membership is off the table for the large semi-Western powers such as Russia itself and Turkey and the smaller countries inhabiting an emerging buffer zone between Russia and the EU, such as Georgia, Ukraine, Azerbaijan, Moldova, and Belarus. These in-between countries find themselves subject to intense competition for influence between Eastern and Western powers. In this context, EU countries must balance their energy dependence on Russia and need for new markets and geopolitical stability with concern for human rights, democratic governance, and self-determination. What are the trade-offs implicit in the foreign policies of Russia, EU member states, and Eastern Europe? What are the best policy approaches? What are the main opportunities and obstacles? REES1570401 Society Sector
PSCI 0600-401 Ancient Political Thought Jeffrey E Green COLL 200 MW 3:30 PM-4:29 PM Through reading texts of Plato (Socrates), Aristotle, Augustine and Aquinas, the student encounters a range of political ideas deeply challenging to--and possibly corrosive of--today's dominant democratic liberalism. Can classical and medieval thinking offer insight into modern impasses in political morality? Is such ancient thinking plausible, useful, or dangerous? CLST1503401 History & Tradition Sector https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=PSCI0600401
PSCI 0600-402 Ancient Political Thought Thomas Owings BENN 16 W 5:15 PM-6:14 PM Through reading texts of Plato (Socrates), Aristotle, Augustine and Aquinas, the student encounters a range of political ideas deeply challenging to--and possibly corrosive of--today's dominant democratic liberalism. Can classical and medieval thinking offer insight into modern impasses in political morality? Is such ancient thinking plausible, useful, or dangerous? CLST1503402 History & Tradition Sector
PSCI 0600-403 Ancient Political Thought Thomas Owings PCPE 225 W 7:00 PM-7:59 PM Through reading texts of Plato (Socrates), Aristotle, Augustine and Aquinas, the student encounters a range of political ideas deeply challenging to--and possibly corrosive of--today's dominant democratic liberalism. Can classical and medieval thinking offer insight into modern impasses in political morality? Is such ancient thinking plausible, useful, or dangerous? CLST1503403 History & Tradition Sector
PSCI 0600-404 Ancient Political Thought Thomas Owings WILL 843 F 1:45 PM-2:44 PM Through reading texts of Plato (Socrates), Aristotle, Augustine and Aquinas, the student encounters a range of political ideas deeply challenging to--and possibly corrosive of--today's dominant democratic liberalism. Can classical and medieval thinking offer insight into modern impasses in political morality? Is such ancient thinking plausible, useful, or dangerous? CLST1503404 History & Tradition Sector
PSCI 0601-601 Modern Political Thought Rosemary C Dubrin WILL 319 W 5:15 PM-8:14 PM This course will provide an overview of major figures and themes of modern political thought. We will focus on themes and questions pertinent to political theory in the modern era, particularly focusing on the relationship of the individual to community, society, and state. Although the emergence of the individual as a central moral, political, and conceptual category arguably began in earlier eras, it is in the seventeenth century that it takes firm hold in defining the state, political institutions, moral thinking, and social relations. The centrality of "the individual" has created difficulties, even paradoxes, for community and social relations, and political theorists have struggled to reconicle those throughout the modern era. We will consider the political forms that emerged out of those struggles, as well as the changed and distinctly "modern" conceptualizations of political theory such as freedom, responsibilty, justice, rights and obligations, as central categories for organizing moral and political life. History & Tradition Sector
PSCI 0602-001 American Political Thought Anne Norton ANNS 110 TR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM Whether America begins with the Puritans and the Mayflower Compact, or with the Declaration of Independence and the Revolution, it is founded in resistance to empire. In the generations between, Americans have desired, dreaded and debated empire. This course will focus on empire and imperialism in American political thought. We will read primary texts addressing empire: from the departure and dissent of the Puritans, and Burke's Speech on Conciliation with the Colonies, to twentieth and twenty-first century debates over America's role in the world. These texts will include political pamphlets and speeches, poetry, novels, policy papers and film. Humanties & Social Science Sector
PSCI 0602-201 American Political Thought Rosemary C Dubrin DRLB 2C2 T 3:30 PM-4:29 PM Whether America begins with the Puritans and the Mayflower Compact, or with the Declaration of Independence and the Revolution, it is founded in resistance to empire. In the generations between, Americans have desired, dreaded and debated empire. This course will focus on empire and imperialism in American political thought. We will read primary texts addressing empire: from the departure and dissent of the Puritans, and Burke's Speech on Conciliation with the Colonies, to twentieth and twenty-first century debates over America's role in the world. These texts will include political pamphlets and speeches, poetry, novels, policy papers and film. Humanties & Social Science Sector
PSCI 0602-202 American Political Thought Rosemary C Dubrin BENN 16 T 5:15 PM-6:14 PM Whether America begins with the Puritans and the Mayflower Compact, or with the Declaration of Independence and the Revolution, it is founded in resistance to empire. In the generations between, Americans have desired, dreaded and debated empire. This course will focus on empire and imperialism in American political thought. We will read primary texts addressing empire: from the departure and dissent of the Puritans, and Burke's Speech on Conciliation with the Colonies, to twentieth and twenty-first century debates over America's role in the world. These texts will include political pamphlets and speeches, poetry, novels, policy papers and film. Humanties & Social Science Sector
PSCI 0602-203 American Political Thought Clancy Murray WILL 843 W 10:15 AM-11:14 AM Whether America begins with the Puritans and the Mayflower Compact, or with the Declaration of Independence and the Revolution, it is founded in resistance to empire. In the generations between, Americans have desired, dreaded and debated empire. This course will focus on empire and imperialism in American political thought. We will read primary texts addressing empire: from the departure and dissent of the Puritans, and Burke's Speech on Conciliation with the Colonies, to twentieth and twenty-first century debates over America's role in the world. These texts will include political pamphlets and speeches, poetry, novels, policy papers and film. Humanties & Social Science Sector
PSCI 0602-204 American Political Thought Clancy Murray PCPE 225 W 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Whether America begins with the Puritans and the Mayflower Compact, or with the Declaration of Independence and the Revolution, it is founded in resistance to empire. In the generations between, Americans have desired, dreaded and debated empire. This course will focus on empire and imperialism in American political thought. We will read primary texts addressing empire: from the departure and dissent of the Puritans, and Burke's Speech on Conciliation with the Colonies, to twentieth and twenty-first century debates over America's role in the world. These texts will include political pamphlets and speeches, poetry, novels, policy papers and film. Humanties & Social Science Sector
PSCI 0602-205 American Political Thought Clancy Murray MEYH B2 R 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Whether America begins with the Puritans and the Mayflower Compact, or with the Declaration of Independence and the Revolution, it is founded in resistance to empire. In the generations between, Americans have desired, dreaded and debated empire. This course will focus on empire and imperialism in American political thought. We will read primary texts addressing empire: from the departure and dissent of the Puritans, and Burke's Speech on Conciliation with the Colonies, to twentieth and twenty-first century debates over America's role in the world. These texts will include political pamphlets and speeches, poetry, novels, policy papers and film. Humanties & Social Science Sector
PSCI 0602-206 American Political Thought Rosemary C Dubrin FAGN 112 R 1:45 PM-2:44 PM Whether America begins with the Puritans and the Mayflower Compact, or with the Declaration of Independence and the Revolution, it is founded in resistance to empire. In the generations between, Americans have desired, dreaded and debated empire. This course will focus on empire and imperialism in American political thought. We will read primary texts addressing empire: from the departure and dissent of the Puritans, and Burke's Speech on Conciliation with the Colonies, to twentieth and twenty-first century debates over America's role in the world. These texts will include political pamphlets and speeches, poetry, novels, policy papers and film. Humanties & Social Science Sector
PSCI 0602-207 American Political Thought BENN 323 F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM Whether America begins with the Puritans and the Mayflower Compact, or with the Declaration of Independence and the Revolution, it is founded in resistance to empire. In the generations between, Americans have desired, dreaded and debated empire. This course will focus on empire and imperialism in American political thought. We will read primary texts addressing empire: from the departure and dissent of the Puritans, and Burke's Speech on Conciliation with the Colonies, to twentieth and twenty-first century debates over America's role in the world. These texts will include political pamphlets and speeches, poetry, novels, policy papers and film. Humanties & Social Science Sector
PSCI 0602-208 American Political Thought GLAB 100 F 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Whether America begins with the Puritans and the Mayflower Compact, or with the Declaration of Independence and the Revolution, it is founded in resistance to empire. In the generations between, Americans have desired, dreaded and debated empire. This course will focus on empire and imperialism in American political thought. We will read primary texts addressing empire: from the departure and dissent of the Puritans, and Burke's Speech on Conciliation with the Colonies, to twentieth and twenty-first century debates over America's role in the world. These texts will include political pamphlets and speeches, poetry, novels, policy papers and film. Humanties & Social Science Sector
PSCI 0602-209 American Political Thought WILL 307 F 1:45 PM-2:44 PM Whether America begins with the Puritans and the Mayflower Compact, or with the Declaration of Independence and the Revolution, it is founded in resistance to empire. In the generations between, Americans have desired, dreaded and debated empire. This course will focus on empire and imperialism in American political thought. We will read primary texts addressing empire: from the departure and dissent of the Puritans, and Burke's Speech on Conciliation with the Colonies, to twentieth and twenty-first century debates over America's role in the world. These texts will include political pamphlets and speeches, poetry, novels, policy papers and film. Humanties & Social Science Sector
PSCI 1120-401 Latin American Politics Juan Manuel Lombera PCPE 202 TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course examines the dynamics of political and economic change in twentieth century Latin America, with the goal of achieving an understanding of contemporary politics in the region. We will analyze topics such as the incorporation of the region to the international economy and the consolidation of oligarchic states (1880s to 1930s), corporatism, populism, and elict pacts (1930s and 1940s), social revolution, democratic breakdown, and military rule (1960s and 1970s), transitions to democracy and human rights advocacy (1980s), makret-oriented reforms (1990s), and the turn to the left of current governments (2000s). The course will draw primarily from the experiences of Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Chile and Mexico. No prior knowledge of the region is required. LALS1120401 Cross Cultural Analysis
PSCI 1140-001 Politics in the Contemporary Middle East Robert Vitalis PCPE 200 MW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is an introduction to the most prominent historical, cultural, institutional, and ideological features of Middle Eastern politics. Typical of the questions we shall address are why processes of modernization and economic change have not produced liberal democracies, why Islamic movements have gained enormous strength in some countries and not others, why conflicts in the region--between Israel and the Arabs, Iran and Iraq, or inside of Lebanon--have been so bitter and protracted; why the era of military coups was brought to an end but transitions to democracy have been difficult to achieve; why Arab unity has been so elusive and yet so insistent a theme; and why oil wealth in the Gulf, in the Arabian Peninsula, and in North Africa, has not produced industrialized or self-sustaining economic growth. Cross Cultural Analysis https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=PSCI1140001
PSCI 1140-201 Politics in the Contemporary Middle East Weston T Bland COLL 315A W 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is an introduction to the most prominent historical, cultural, institutional, and ideological features of Middle Eastern politics. Typical of the questions we shall address are why processes of modernization and economic change have not produced liberal democracies, why Islamic movements have gained enormous strength in some countries and not others, why conflicts in the region--between Israel and the Arabs, Iran and Iraq, or inside of Lebanon--have been so bitter and protracted; why the era of military coups was brought to an end but transitions to democracy have been difficult to achieve; why Arab unity has been so elusive and yet so insistent a theme; and why oil wealth in the Gulf, in the Arabian Peninsula, and in North Africa, has not produced industrialized or self-sustaining economic growth. Cross Cultural Analysis
PSCI 1140-202 Politics in the Contemporary Middle East Weston T Bland DRLB 4N30 W 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course is an introduction to the most prominent historical, cultural, institutional, and ideological features of Middle Eastern politics. Typical of the questions we shall address are why processes of modernization and economic change have not produced liberal democracies, why Islamic movements have gained enormous strength in some countries and not others, why conflicts in the region--between Israel and the Arabs, Iran and Iraq, or inside of Lebanon--have been so bitter and protracted; why the era of military coups was brought to an end but transitions to democracy have been difficult to achieve; why Arab unity has been so elusive and yet so insistent a theme; and why oil wealth in the Gulf, in the Arabian Peninsula, and in North Africa, has not produced industrialized or self-sustaining economic growth. Cross Cultural Analysis
PSCI 1140-203 Politics in the Contemporary Middle East Weston T Bland CHEM 109 R 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course is an introduction to the most prominent historical, cultural, institutional, and ideological features of Middle Eastern politics. Typical of the questions we shall address are why processes of modernization and economic change have not produced liberal democracies, why Islamic movements have gained enormous strength in some countries and not others, why conflicts in the region--between Israel and the Arabs, Iran and Iraq, or inside of Lebanon--have been so bitter and protracted; why the era of military coups was brought to an end but transitions to democracy have been difficult to achieve; why Arab unity has been so elusive and yet so insistent a theme; and why oil wealth in the Gulf, in the Arabian Peninsula, and in North Africa, has not produced industrialized or self-sustaining economic growth. Cross Cultural Analysis
PSCI 1160-401 Democracy and Development in India Tariq Thachil PSYL A30 TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course introduces students to the complex issues surrounding questions of political and economic development in India, the world's largest democracy, and home to a large chunk of the globe's low-income population. Not surprisingly, the successes and failures of India are tremendously important to the study of democracy and development. The experiences of countries in this region have given rise to influential theories of development. The policy prescriptions these theories have produced have in turn been applied back onto India, with spectacular results- both positive and negative. Over the course of the semester, we will use the concrete experiences from the past seven decades in India to ask and answer fundamental questions about development, including: Does democratic politics help or hurt prospects for economic development? Why are some poor countries like India are able to maintain democracies, while equally poor countries in the region, such as Pakistan, are not? How did British colonialism shape the nature of post-colonial development? Should the state or the market play a dominant role in the economies of newly independent nations? How can we best measure poverty, and what have been the challenges to reducing it in the developing world? What are the challenges and opportunities produced by rapid international migration to rich countries? The course is divided into four thematic units, which build upon one another. Within each theme, we draw from a wide array of source materials, reading scholarship in political science, economics, sociology, and anthropology, journalistic non-fiction, and even film. While empirically focusing on India, we will also read about the experiences of other countries in South Asia, and also from East Asia, Latin America, and sub-Saharan African in specific weeks. This will help students place the experiences of South Asian countries in broader comparative perspective. SAST1160401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=PSCI1160401
PSCI 1202-001 Changing American Electorate Daniel Jacob Hopkins MCNB 285 MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM In 1960, a Democratic candidate won a very narrow Presidential victory with just 100,000 votes; in 2000, the Democratic candidate lost but received 500,000 more votes than his opponent. Still, contemporary scholars and journalists have made a variety of arguments about just how much the American political landscape changed in the intervening 40 years, often calling recent decades a transformation. This course explores and critically evaluates those arguments. Key questions include: how, if at all, have Americans political attitudes and ideologies changed? How have their connections to politics changed? What has this meant for the fortunes and strategies of the two parties? How have the parties base voters and swing voters changed? What changes in American society have advantaged some political messages and parties at the expense of others? Focusing primarily on mass-level politics, we consider a wide range of potential causes, including the role of race in American politics, suburbanization, economic transformations, the evolving constellation and structure of interest groups, declining social capital, the changing role of religion, immigration, and the actions of parties and political elites. For three weeks in the semester, we will take a break from considering broader trends to look at specific elections in some depth. Quantitative Data Analysis https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=PSCI1202001
PSCI 1207-401 Who Gets Elected and Why? The Science of Politics Edward G Rendell COHN 402 M 5:15 PM-8:14 PM What does it take to get elected to office? What are the key elements of a successful political campaign? What are the crucial issues guiding campaigns and elections in the U.S. at the beginning of the 21st century? This class will address the process and results of electoral politics at the local, state, and federal levels. Course participants will study the stages and strategies of running for public office and will discuss the various influences on getting elected, including: Campaign finance and fundraising, demographics, polling, the media, staffing, economics, and party organization. Each week we will be joined by guest speakers who are nationally recognized professionals, with expertise in different areas of the campaign and election process. Students will also analyze campaign case studies and the career of the instructor himself. Edward G. Rendell is the former Mayor of Philadelphia, former Chair of the Democratic National Committee, and former Governor of Pennsylvania. GAFL5090401, URBS3200401
PSCI 1290-401 Race and Ethnic Politics Daniel Q Gillion COHN 402 TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course examines the role of race and ethnicity in the political discourse through a comparative survey of recent literature on the historical and contemporary political experiences of the four major minority groups (Blacks or African Americans, American Indians, Latinos or Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans). A few of the key topics will include assimilation and acculturation seen in the Asian American community, understanding the political direction of Black America in a pre and post Civil Rights era, and assessing the emergence of Hispanics as the largest minority group and the political impact of this demographic change. Throughout the semester, the course will introduce students to significant minority legislation, political behavior, social movements, litigation/court rulings, media, and various forms of public opinion that have shaped the history of racial and ethnic minority relations in this country. Readings are drawn from books and articles written by contemporary political scientists. LALS1290401 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
PSCI 1290-402 Race and Ethnic Politics Samuel Wolken WILL 2 F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course examines the role of race and ethnicity in the political discourse through a comparative survey of recent literature on the historical and contemporary political experiences of the four major minority groups (Blacks or African Americans, American Indians, Latinos or Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans). A few of the key topics will include assimilation and acculturation seen in the Asian American community, understanding the political direction of Black America in a pre and post Civil Rights era, and assessing the emergence of Hispanics as the largest minority group and the political impact of this demographic change. Throughout the semester, the course will introduce students to significant minority legislation, political behavior, social movements, litigation/court rulings, media, and various forms of public opinion that have shaped the history of racial and ethnic minority relations in this country. Readings are drawn from books and articles written by contemporary political scientists. LALS1290402 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
PSCI 1290-403 Race and Ethnic Politics Samuel Wolken WILL 2 F 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course examines the role of race and ethnicity in the political discourse through a comparative survey of recent literature on the historical and contemporary political experiences of the four major minority groups (Blacks or African Americans, American Indians, Latinos or Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans). A few of the key topics will include assimilation and acculturation seen in the Asian American community, understanding the political direction of Black America in a pre and post Civil Rights era, and assessing the emergence of Hispanics as the largest minority group and the political impact of this demographic change. Throughout the semester, the course will introduce students to significant minority legislation, political behavior, social movements, litigation/court rulings, media, and various forms of public opinion that have shaped the history of racial and ethnic minority relations in this country. Readings are drawn from books and articles written by contemporary political scientists. LALS1290403 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
PSCI 1290-404 Race and Ethnic Politics Samuel Wolken WILL 6 F 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course examines the role of race and ethnicity in the political discourse through a comparative survey of recent literature on the historical and contemporary political experiences of the four major minority groups (Blacks or African Americans, American Indians, Latinos or Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans). A few of the key topics will include assimilation and acculturation seen in the Asian American community, understanding the political direction of Black America in a pre and post Civil Rights era, and assessing the emergence of Hispanics as the largest minority group and the political impact of this demographic change. Throughout the semester, the course will introduce students to significant minority legislation, political behavior, social movements, litigation/court rulings, media, and various forms of public opinion that have shaped the history of racial and ethnic minority relations in this country. Readings are drawn from books and articles written by contemporary political scientists. LALS1290404 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
PSCI 1402-001 International Political Economy Mark A Pollack COLL 200 TR 5:15 PM-6:14 PM This course examines the politics of international economic relations. The course will analyze the interplay between politics and economics in three broad areas: international trade, international finance, and economic development. In each section, we will first discuss economic theories that explain the causes and consequences of international commerce, capital flows, and economic growth. We will then explore how political interests, institutions, and ideas alter these predictions, examining both historical examples and current policy debates.
PSCI 1402-201 International Political Economy Rashi Sabherwal COLL 315A F 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course examines the politics of international economic relations. The course will analyze the interplay between politics and economics in three broad areas: international trade, international finance, and economic development. In each section, we will first discuss economic theories that explain the causes and consequences of international commerce, capital flows, and economic growth. We will then explore how political interests, institutions, and ideas alter these predictions, examining both historical examples and current policy debates.
PSCI 1402-202 International Political Economy Divyansh Saxena COLL 315A F 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course examines the politics of international economic relations. The course will analyze the interplay between politics and economics in three broad areas: international trade, international finance, and economic development. In each section, we will first discuss economic theories that explain the causes and consequences of international commerce, capital flows, and economic growth. We will then explore how political interests, institutions, and ideas alter these predictions, examining both historical examples and current policy debates.
PSCI 1402-203 International Political Economy Divyansh Saxena WILL 1 M 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course examines the politics of international economic relations. The course will analyze the interplay between politics and economics in three broad areas: international trade, international finance, and economic development. In each section, we will first discuss economic theories that explain the causes and consequences of international commerce, capital flows, and economic growth. We will then explore how political interests, institutions, and ideas alter these predictions, examining both historical examples and current policy debates.
PSCI 1402-204 International Political Economy Divyansh Saxena PCPE 203 M 5:15 PM-6:14 PM This course examines the politics of international economic relations. The course will analyze the interplay between politics and economics in three broad areas: international trade, international finance, and economic development. In each section, we will first discuss economic theories that explain the causes and consequences of international commerce, capital flows, and economic growth. We will then explore how political interests, institutions, and ideas alter these predictions, examining both historical examples and current policy debates.
PSCI 1402-205 International Political Economy Rashi Sabherwal PCPE 225 F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course examines the politics of international economic relations. The course will analyze the interplay between politics and economics in three broad areas: international trade, international finance, and economic development. In each section, we will first discuss economic theories that explain the causes and consequences of international commerce, capital flows, and economic growth. We will then explore how political interests, institutions, and ideas alter these predictions, examining both historical examples and current policy debates.
PSCI 1402-206 International Political Economy Rashi Sabherwal BENN 16 F 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course examines the politics of international economic relations. The course will analyze the interplay between politics and economics in three broad areas: international trade, international finance, and economic development. In each section, we will first discuss economic theories that explain the causes and consequences of international commerce, capital flows, and economic growth. We will then explore how political interests, institutions, and ideas alter these predictions, examining both historical examples and current policy debates.
PSCI 1606-001 Freedom, Power, and Equality Nancy J Hirschmann FAGN 114 MW 1:45 PM-2:44 PM The concepts of freedom, power and equality are what have been called “essentially contested concepts.” These three concepts take a particular significance in the 20th and 21st centuries due to the proliferation of war, industrialization, technology, as well as the growth of democracy and the accompanying shifts in social relations these have all brought about. We think that we have a pretty clear and straightforward understanding of what they mean—freedom means doing what I want, power is domination, equality is sameness. But when we look at how these ideals are lived in real life, we can see that they are in fact a lot more complicated than that. For instance, does poverty reduce freedom and wealth enhance it, or is really only a matter of inequality and people’s choices as many maintain? How do categories like race, gender, and sexuality affect the ways that freedom, power, and equality are experienced? Can power be exercised in relations of equality or does it always suggest inequality? How do we know when power is a hindrance to freedom, or when it is an enhancement of it? How do these three concepts intersect and intertwine to alter their meanings in different settings and in response to different sorts of events? https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=PSCI1606001
PSCI 1606-201 Freedom, Power, and Equality DRLB 4C8 R 12:00 PM-12:59 PM The concepts of freedom, power and equality are what have been called “essentially contested concepts.” These three concepts take a particular significance in the 20th and 21st centuries due to the proliferation of war, industrialization, technology, as well as the growth of democracy and the accompanying shifts in social relations these have all brought about. We think that we have a pretty clear and straightforward understanding of what they mean—freedom means doing what I want, power is domination, equality is sameness. But when we look at how these ideals are lived in real life, we can see that they are in fact a lot more complicated than that. For instance, does poverty reduce freedom and wealth enhance it, or is really only a matter of inequality and people’s choices as many maintain? How do categories like race, gender, and sexuality affect the ways that freedom, power, and equality are experienced? Can power be exercised in relations of equality or does it always suggest inequality? How do we know when power is a hindrance to freedom, or when it is an enhancement of it? How do these three concepts intersect and intertwine to alter their meanings in different settings and in response to different sorts of events?
PSCI 1606-202 Freedom, Power, and Equality WILL 27 R 1:45 PM-2:44 PM The concepts of freedom, power and equality are what have been called “essentially contested concepts.” These three concepts take a particular significance in the 20th and 21st centuries due to the proliferation of war, industrialization, technology, as well as the growth of democracy and the accompanying shifts in social relations these have all brought about. We think that we have a pretty clear and straightforward understanding of what they mean—freedom means doing what I want, power is domination, equality is sameness. But when we look at how these ideals are lived in real life, we can see that they are in fact a lot more complicated than that. For instance, does poverty reduce freedom and wealth enhance it, or is really only a matter of inequality and people’s choices as many maintain? How do categories like race, gender, and sexuality affect the ways that freedom, power, and equality are experienced? Can power be exercised in relations of equality or does it always suggest inequality? How do we know when power is a hindrance to freedom, or when it is an enhancement of it? How do these three concepts intersect and intertwine to alter their meanings in different settings and in response to different sorts of events?
PSCI 1606-203 Freedom, Power, and Equality WILL 843 F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM The concepts of freedom, power and equality are what have been called “essentially contested concepts.” These three concepts take a particular significance in the 20th and 21st centuries due to the proliferation of war, industrialization, technology, as well as the growth of democracy and the accompanying shifts in social relations these have all brought about. We think that we have a pretty clear and straightforward understanding of what they mean—freedom means doing what I want, power is domination, equality is sameness. But when we look at how these ideals are lived in real life, we can see that they are in fact a lot more complicated than that. For instance, does poverty reduce freedom and wealth enhance it, or is really only a matter of inequality and people’s choices as many maintain? How do categories like race, gender, and sexuality affect the ways that freedom, power, and equality are experienced? Can power be exercised in relations of equality or does it always suggest inequality? How do we know when power is a hindrance to freedom, or when it is an enhancement of it? How do these three concepts intersect and intertwine to alter their meanings in different settings and in response to different sorts of events?
PSCI 1800-001 Introduction to Data Science Matthew Levendusky LRSM AUD MW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM Understanding and interpreting large, quantitative data sets is increasingly central in political and social science. Whether one seeks to understand political communication, international trade, inter-group conflict, or other issues, the availability of large quantities of digital data has revolutionized the study of politics. Nonetheless, most data-related courses focus on statistical estimation, rather than on the related but distinctive problems of data acquisition, management and visualization--in a term, data science. This course addresses that imbalance by focusing squarely on data science. Leaving this course, students will be able to acquire, format, analyze, and visualize various types of political data using the statistical programming language R. This course is not a statistics class, but it will increase the capacity of students to thrive in future statistics classes. While no background in statistics or political science is required, students are expected to be generally familiar with contemporary computing environments (e.g. know how to use a computer) and have a willingness to learn a variety of data science tools. You are encouraged (but certainly not required) to register for both this course and PSCI 338 at the same time, as the courses cover distinct, but complimentary material. Quantitative Data Analysis https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=PSCI1800001
PSCI 1800-201 Introduction to Data Science Jon Griffiths PCPE 203 W 1:45 PM-2:44 PM Understanding and interpreting large, quantitative data sets is increasingly central in political and social science. Whether one seeks to understand political communication, international trade, inter-group conflict, or other issues, the availability of large quantities of digital data has revolutionized the study of politics. Nonetheless, most data-related courses focus on statistical estimation, rather than on the related but distinctive problems of data acquisition, management and visualization--in a term, data science. This course addresses that imbalance by focusing squarely on data science. Leaving this course, students will be able to acquire, format, analyze, and visualize various types of political data using the statistical programming language R. This course is not a statistics class, but it will increase the capacity of students to thrive in future statistics classes. While no background in statistics or political science is required, students are expected to be generally familiar with contemporary computing environments (e.g. know how to use a computer) and have a willingness to learn a variety of data science tools. You are encouraged (but certainly not required) to register for both this course and PSCI 338 at the same time, as the courses cover distinct, but complimentary material. Quantitative Data Analysis
PSCI 1800-202 Introduction to Data Science Jon Griffiths PCPE 202 W 3:30 PM-4:29 PM Understanding and interpreting large, quantitative data sets is increasingly central in political and social science. Whether one seeks to understand political communication, international trade, inter-group conflict, or other issues, the availability of large quantities of digital data has revolutionized the study of politics. Nonetheless, most data-related courses focus on statistical estimation, rather than on the related but distinctive problems of data acquisition, management and visualization--in a term, data science. This course addresses that imbalance by focusing squarely on data science. Leaving this course, students will be able to acquire, format, analyze, and visualize various types of political data using the statistical programming language R. This course is not a statistics class, but it will increase the capacity of students to thrive in future statistics classes. While no background in statistics or political science is required, students are expected to be generally familiar with contemporary computing environments (e.g. know how to use a computer) and have a willingness to learn a variety of data science tools. You are encouraged (but certainly not required) to register for both this course and PSCI 338 at the same time, as the courses cover distinct, but complimentary material. Quantitative Data Analysis
PSCI 1800-203 Introduction to Data Science WILL 843 W 5:15 PM-6:14 PM Understanding and interpreting large, quantitative data sets is increasingly central in political and social science. Whether one seeks to understand political communication, international trade, inter-group conflict, or other issues, the availability of large quantities of digital data has revolutionized the study of politics. Nonetheless, most data-related courses focus on statistical estimation, rather than on the related but distinctive problems of data acquisition, management and visualization--in a term, data science. This course addresses that imbalance by focusing squarely on data science. Leaving this course, students will be able to acquire, format, analyze, and visualize various types of political data using the statistical programming language R. This course is not a statistics class, but it will increase the capacity of students to thrive in future statistics classes. While no background in statistics or political science is required, students are expected to be generally familiar with contemporary computing environments (e.g. know how to use a computer) and have a willingness to learn a variety of data science tools. You are encouraged (but certainly not required) to register for both this course and PSCI 338 at the same time, as the courses cover distinct, but complimentary material. Quantitative Data Analysis
PSCI 1800-204 Introduction to Data Science BENN 16 R 10:15 AM-11:14 AM Understanding and interpreting large, quantitative data sets is increasingly central in political and social science. Whether one seeks to understand political communication, international trade, inter-group conflict, or other issues, the availability of large quantities of digital data has revolutionized the study of politics. Nonetheless, most data-related courses focus on statistical estimation, rather than on the related but distinctive problems of data acquisition, management and visualization--in a term, data science. This course addresses that imbalance by focusing squarely on data science. Leaving this course, students will be able to acquire, format, analyze, and visualize various types of political data using the statistical programming language R. This course is not a statistics class, but it will increase the capacity of students to thrive in future statistics classes. While no background in statistics or political science is required, students are expected to be generally familiar with contemporary computing environments (e.g. know how to use a computer) and have a willingness to learn a variety of data science tools. You are encouraged (but certainly not required) to register for both this course and PSCI 338 at the same time, as the courses cover distinct, but complimentary material. Quantitative Data Analysis
PSCI 1800-205 Introduction to Data Science Jon Griffiths GLAB 102 R 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Understanding and interpreting large, quantitative data sets is increasingly central in political and social science. Whether one seeks to understand political communication, international trade, inter-group conflict, or other issues, the availability of large quantities of digital data has revolutionized the study of politics. Nonetheless, most data-related courses focus on statistical estimation, rather than on the related but distinctive problems of data acquisition, management and visualization--in a term, data science. This course addresses that imbalance by focusing squarely on data science. Leaving this course, students will be able to acquire, format, analyze, and visualize various types of political data using the statistical programming language R. This course is not a statistics class, but it will increase the capacity of students to thrive in future statistics classes. While no background in statistics or political science is required, students are expected to be generally familiar with contemporary computing environments (e.g. know how to use a computer) and have a willingness to learn a variety of data science tools. You are encouraged (but certainly not required) to register for both this course and PSCI 338 at the same time, as the courses cover distinct, but complimentary material. Quantitative Data Analysis
PSCI 1800-206 Introduction to Data Science COLL 315A F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM Understanding and interpreting large, quantitative data sets is increasingly central in political and social science. Whether one seeks to understand political communication, international trade, inter-group conflict, or other issues, the availability of large quantities of digital data has revolutionized the study of politics. Nonetheless, most data-related courses focus on statistical estimation, rather than on the related but distinctive problems of data acquisition, management and visualization--in a term, data science. This course addresses that imbalance by focusing squarely on data science. Leaving this course, students will be able to acquire, format, analyze, and visualize various types of political data using the statistical programming language R. This course is not a statistics class, but it will increase the capacity of students to thrive in future statistics classes. While no background in statistics or political science is required, students are expected to be generally familiar with contemporary computing environments (e.g. know how to use a computer) and have a willingness to learn a variety of data science tools. You are encouraged (but certainly not required) to register for both this course and PSCI 338 at the same time, as the courses cover distinct, but complimentary material. Quantitative Data Analysis
PSCI 1801-001 Statistical Methods PSCI Marc N Meredith COLL 314 MW 1:45 PM-2:44 PM The goal of this class is to expose students to the process by which quantitative political science research is conducted. The class will take us down three separate, but related tracks. Track one will teach some basic tools necessary to conduct quantitative political science research. Topics covered will include descriptive statistics, sampling, probability and statistical theory, and regression analysis. However, conducting empirical research requires that we actually be able to apply these tools. Thus, track two will teach us how to implement some of these basic tools using the computer program R. However, if we want to implement these tools, we also need to be able to develop hypotheses that we want to test. Thus, track three will teach some basics in research design. Topics will include independent and dependent variables, generating testable hypotheses, and issues in causalit You are encouraged to register for both this course an PSCI 107 at the same time, as the courses cover distin but complementary, material. But there are no prerequi nor is registering for PSCI 107 necessary, in order to take this course. The class satisfies the College of A Science Quantitative Data Analysis (QDA) requirement. Quantitative Data Analysis https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=PSCI1801001
PSCI 1801-201 Statistical Methods PSCI Marc N Meredith WILL 3 R 1:45 PM-2:44 PM The goal of this class is to expose students to the process by which quantitative political science research is conducted. The class will take us down three separate, but related tracks. Track one will teach some basic tools necessary to conduct quantitative political science research. Topics covered will include descriptive statistics, sampling, probability and statistical theory, and regression analysis. However, conducting empirical research requires that we actually be able to apply these tools. Thus, track two will teach us how to implement some of these basic tools using the computer program R. However, if we want to implement these tools, we also need to be able to develop hypotheses that we want to test. Thus, track three will teach some basics in research design. Topics will include independent and dependent variables, generating testable hypotheses, and issues in causalit You are encouraged to register for both this course an PSCI 107 at the same time, as the courses cover distin but complementary, material. But there are no prerequi nor is registering for PSCI 107 necessary, in order to take this course. The class satisfies the College of A Science Quantitative Data Analysis (QDA) requirement. Quantitative Data Analysis
PSCI 1801-202 Statistical Methods PSCI Marc N Meredith The goal of this class is to expose students to the process by which quantitative political science research is conducted. The class will take us down three separate, but related tracks. Track one will teach some basic tools necessary to conduct quantitative political science research. Topics covered will include descriptive statistics, sampling, probability and statistical theory, and regression analysis. However, conducting empirical research requires that we actually be able to apply these tools. Thus, track two will teach us how to implement some of these basic tools using the computer program R. However, if we want to implement these tools, we also need to be able to develop hypotheses that we want to test. Thus, track three will teach some basics in research design. Topics will include independent and dependent variables, generating testable hypotheses, and issues in causalit You are encouraged to register for both this course an PSCI 107 at the same time, as the courses cover distin but complementary, material. But there are no prerequi nor is registering for PSCI 107 necessary, in order to take this course. The class satisfies the College of A Science Quantitative Data Analysis (QDA) requirement. Quantitative Data Analysis
PSCI 1991-001 Constitutional Law Marci Ann Hamilton ANNS 111 MW 5:15 PM-6:44 PM Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one course may be taken in a given semester. Recent titles have included: The Analysis of Presidential Elections, Conservative Political Economy, and Political Geography.
PSCI 2200-301 Preparing for Policy Work in Washington Deirdre Martinez Designed to complement a policy internship, this two credit course will focus on content and skills that are likely to be useful in typical Washington offices. Students will develop literacy on the most pressing domestic policy topics and will work on writing and presentation skills. All students will participate in a public policy internship for at least ten hours a week. Perm Needed From Instructor
PSCI 2210-301 Balance of Power in American Politics (PIW) Miguel E Rodriguez How do the Constitution's checks and balances work in practice? And where are they not working? This course examines the fault lines between Washington's two most powerful institutions - Congress and the President - how they clash, and where they work together. Students learn how Congress and the President share and compete for power in lawmaking, spending, investigations, nominations, foreign policy, and impeachment. The course is designed to foster skills in formulating strategies for conducting policy in an environment of institutions competing for power. Perm Needed From Instructor
PSCI 2211-301 The Mechanics of American Foreign Policy (PIW) Joshua R Blumenfeld The Trump Presidency has profoundly shifted America's role in the world and the way in which key institutions of foreign policy making are staffed and positioned to advance America's interests. The ascent of extreme nationalists and nationalism in other power centers in the world along with growing distrust in government and public institutions may have marked the close of the two-decade post 9/11 era. Indeed, the global COVID-19 pandemic and the ways in which actors across the international spectrum have responded (or failed to respond) has led many to question the assumptions inherent in the post-9/11 international order and has marked the beginning of a new era of competition, a return to great-power politics, and the diminishing power of traditional actors, systems, and ideals on the global stage. This course will provide students with an in-depth, practical analysis of foreign policy and foreign policy making, with a view from Washington. It will also provide a baseline global literacy, through the lens of emerging ideas, institutions, interests, and actors, and focus on a framework for understanding shifts already underway in how Washington views the world. We will utilize less traditional resources, and instead focus on practical and "real-world" course material as well as less traditional instruction methods - utilizing and analyzing the sources and resources that policy makers in Washington rely upon. These include long-form journalism, official government documents, hearings and Congressional debate, think tank products, and news sources. Students will have the opportunity to engage with a variety of guest-speakers, all of whom have held senior official and non-governmental roles in American foreign policy making and influencing. Guest speakers will provide unique insight into their own experiences at the highest levels of foreign policy making and advocacy, and offer guidance as to how to pursue careers in foreign policy, national security, and international development. In the past, guest speakers have included: Former Deputy Secretaries of State William Burns and Heather Higginbottom; Executive Director of the ONE Campaign; Former Director of Policy Planning at the State Department; Former Ambassadors, Senior Professional Staff from the House Committee on Foreign Affairs and Senate Foreign Relations Committee, former Assistant Secretary of Population, Refugees, and Migration, among others. Perm Needed From Instructor
PSCI 2420-401 Diplomacy in the Americas - The Penn Model OAS Program Catherine E M Bartch FAGN 214
FAGN 214
TR 4:30 PM-5:59 PM "Diplomacy in the Americas" an academically based community service course in which students work with Philadelphia and Norristown public school students to explore solutions to critical problems facing the Americas. Entrenched political, economic, and social inequality, combined with environmental degradation, weak institutions, pervasive health epidemics, weapon proliferation, and other issues pose formidable hurdles for strengthening democratic ideals and institutions. The Organization of the American States (OAS), the world's oldest regional organization, is uniquely poised to confront these challenges. "Diplomacy in the Americas" guides students through the process of writing policy resolutions as though the students were Organization of the American States (OAS) diplomats, basing their research and proposals on democracy, development, security, and human rights - the four pillars of the OAS. Students will also read literature about what it means to educate for a democracy and global citizenry, and they will have the opportunity to turn theory into practice by creating and executing curriculum to teach and mentor the high school students through interactive and experiential pedagogies. LALS3020401 Cross Cultural Analysis
PSCI 3401-001 International Law Beth Ann Simmons PCPE AUD W 3:30 PM-5:29 PM Do legal rules really affect international politics? This course explores why international law has the form and content it does, and its role in shaping how states and other actors behave. It combines law and social science to examine important issues of the day, including security policies, human rights, and economic relationships. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=PSCI3401001
PSCI 3401-201 International Law Catalina Udani DRLB 2C8 R 3:30 PM-4:29 PM Do legal rules really affect international politics? This course explores why international law has the form and content it does, and its role in shaping how states and other actors behave. It combines law and social science to examine important issues of the day, including security policies, human rights, and economic relationships.
PSCI 3401-202 International Law Catalina Udani DRLB 4C8 M 1:45 PM-2:44 PM Do legal rules really affect international politics? This course explores why international law has the form and content it does, and its role in shaping how states and other actors behave. It combines law and social science to examine important issues of the day, including security policies, human rights, and economic relationships.
PSCI 3401-203 International Law Gino N Pauselli DRLB 2C4 R 10:15 AM-11:14 AM Do legal rules really affect international politics? This course explores why international law has the form and content it does, and its role in shaping how states and other actors behave. It combines law and social science to examine important issues of the day, including security policies, human rights, and economic relationships.
PSCI 3401-204 International Law PCPE 200 R 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Do legal rules really affect international politics? This course explores why international law has the form and content it does, and its role in shaping how states and other actors behave. It combines law and social science to examine important issues of the day, including security policies, human rights, and economic relationships.
PSCI 3401-205 International Law Catalina Udani DRLB 4N30 R 1:45 PM-2:44 PM Do legal rules really affect international politics? This course explores why international law has the form and content it does, and its role in shaping how states and other actors behave. It combines law and social science to examine important issues of the day, including security policies, human rights, and economic relationships.
PSCI 3401-206 International Law Gino N Pauselli DRLB 3N6 F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM Do legal rules really affect international politics? This course explores why international law has the form and content it does, and its role in shaping how states and other actors behave. It combines law and social science to examine important issues of the day, including security policies, human rights, and economic relationships.
PSCI 3802-001 Survey Research and Design William Marble MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Political polls are a central feature of elections and are ubiquitously employed to understand and explain voter intentions and public opinion. This course will examine political polling by focusing on four main areas of consideration. First, what is the role of political polls in a functioning democracy? This area will explore the theoretical justifications for polling as a representation of public opinion. Second, the course will explore the business and use of political polling, including media coverage of polls, use by politicians for political strategy and messaging, and the impact polls have on elections specifically and politics more broadly. The third area will focus on the nuts and bolts of election and political polls, specifically with regard to exploring traditional questions and scales used for political measurement; the construction and considerations of likely voter models; measurement of the horserace; and samples and modes used for election polls. The course will additionally cover a fourth area of special topics, which will include exit polling, prediction markets, polling aggregation, and other topics. It is not necessary for students to have any specialized mathematical or statistical background for this course. Perm Needed From Department
PSCI 3991-301 Future of Conservatism and the GOP (SNF Paideia Program Course) Deirdre Martinez
Evan Mcmullin
VANP 114 F 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one course may be taken in a given semester. Recent titles have included: Sustainable Environmental Policy & Global Politics; Shakespeare and Political Theory. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=PSCI3991301
PSCI 3991-302 Democracy and Disagreement (SNF Paideia Program Course) Ian Macmullen MCNB 285 TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one course may be taken in a given semester. Recent titles have included: Sustainable Environmental Policy & Global Politics; Shakespeare and Political Theory. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=PSCI3991302
PSCI 3991-303 Comparative Politics of the Welfare State Julia F Lynch VANP 113 W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one course may be taken in a given semester. Recent titles have included: Sustainable Environmental Policy & Global Politics; Shakespeare and Political Theory.
PSCI 4100-001 Power Sharing in Deeply Divided Places - BFS Brendan O'Leary PCPE 225 W 3:30 PM-6:29 PM This course examines conceptual, explanatory and normative debates over power-sharing systems. We explore the circumstances in which federal, consociational and other power-sharing institutions and practices are proposed and implemented to regulate deep national, ethnic, religious or linguistic divisions. We evaluate these systems, seeking to explain why they are formed or attempted, and why they may endure or fail, paying special attention to bi- and multi-national, multi-ethnic, multi-religious and multi-lingual environments. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=PSCI4100001
PSCI 4130-401 Oil to Diamonds: The Political Economy of Natural Resources in Africa Adewale Adebanwi WILL 316 R 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This course examines the ways in which the processes of the extraction, refining, sale and use of natural resources – including oil and diamond – in Africa produce complex regional and global dynamics. We explore how values are placed on resources, how such values, the regimes of valuation, commodification and the social formations that are (re)produced by these regimes lead to cooperation and conflict in the contemporary African state, including in the relationships of resource-rich African countries with global powers. Specific cases will be examined against the backdrop of theoretical insights to encourage comparative analyses beyond Africa. Some audio-visual materials will be used to enhance the understanding of the political economy and sociality of natural resources. AFRC4500401, AFRC5700401, ANTH3045401, ANTH5700401, SOCI2904401, SOCI5700401
PSCI 4190-401 Race and Racism in the Contemporary World Michael G Hanchard MEYH B2 M 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This undergraduate seminar is for advanced undergraduates seeking to make sense of the upsurge in racist activism, combined with authoritarian populism and neo-fascist mobilization in many parts of the world. Contemporary manifestations of the phenomena noted above will be examined in a comparative and historical perspective to identify patterns and anomalies across various multiple nation-states. France, The United States, Britain, and Italy will be the countries examined. AFRC4650401, LALS4650401
PSCI 4200-301 Political Psychology Michele Francine Margolis BENN 323 R 10:15 AM-1:14 PM How do campaign advertisements influence voters' perceptions and behavior? What roles do emotions play in politics? Do we all harbor some measure of racism, sexism, or homophobia, and what role do these stereotypes play in political behavior? How and why do ideologies form, and how does partisanship influence the way that voters understand the political world? How do people perceive threat, and what are the psychological consequences of terrorism? These questions, and many others, are the province of political psychology, an interdisciplinary field that uses experimental methods and theoretical ideas from psychology as tools to examine the world of politics. In this course, we will explore the role of human thought, emotion, and behavior in politics and examine the psychological origins of citizens' political beliefs and actions from a variety of perspectives. Most of the readings emphasize politics in the United States, though the field itself speaks to every aspect of political science. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=PSCI4200301
PSCI 4450-301 Chinese Foreign Policy Fiona Cunningham PCPE 202 T 3:30 PM-6:29 PM This seminar examines the influences on and patterns of China's international relations. Topics to be covered include the following:theoretical approaches to analyzing foreign policy; the historical legacy and evolution of China's foreign policy; contemporary China's foreign policy on traditional national security concerns as well as economic, environmental, and humanitarian issues; China's military modernization; China's foreign policy in Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America; China's rise and its implications for relations with the United States. The class is a seminar in which student preparation and participation will essential. Students planning to enroll in the course must have taken PSCI 219 (or, with the instructor's permission, its equivalent). You are expected to complete all required readings each week and come to seminar meetings prepared to discuss them. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=PSCI4450301
PSCI 4897-301 Andrea Mitchell Center Undergraduate Research Seminar Jeffrey E Green The course is intended for Andrea Mitchell Centre Undergraduate Fellows to present their research ideas, share with the class progress on their ongoing projects, and receive constructive feedback from fellow students and the course instructor. Perm Needed From Instructor
PSCI 4991-302 How Int'l Organizations Work Julia C Gray PCPE 203 T 12:00 PM-2:59 PM Consult department for detailed descriptions. Recent topics include: Globalization; Race & Criminal Justice; Democracy & Markets in Postcommunist Europe.
PSCI 4997-001 Political Science Honors Bess Davis MCNB 395 T 12:00 PM-2:59 PM This is a mandatory seminar for all students planning to submit an honors thesis for the purpose of possibly earning distinction in Political Science upon graduation. The course is aimed at helping students identify a useful and feasible research question, become familiar with the relevant literatures and debates pertaining to that question, develop a basic understanding of what might constitute "good" and "original" research in different subfields, and set up a plan for conducting and presenting the research. The course is also aimed at building a community of like-minded student researchers, which can complement and enrich the honor student's individual experience of working one-on-one with a dedicated faculty thesis advisor. Students apply in the spring of their junior year for admissions to the honors program and enrollment in PSCI497. Perm Needed From Instructor
PSCI 5290-401 Inequality & Race Policy Daniel Q Gillion 36MK 112 R 1:45 PM-4:44 PM There is little question that inequality along the lines of race and ethnicity remain a constant problem in American society. And over time, the federal government has implemented several policy initiatives to address these inequities. However, less well understood is the success of these federal policies or the process in which they emerge from government as a viable solution. This course will provide an overview of the link between federal government action and changes in minority inequality. We will analyze several issue spaces that cover health, crime and incarceration, social policy and equal rights, education, welfare, and economics. We will take a multi-method approach to exploring the success of federal policies by conducting historical assessments and statistical analysis. Advanced undergraduates are welcome to take the course with permission. AFRC5240401
PSCI 5800-301 Game Theory Alexander R Weisiger MEYH B7 TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course provides an introduction to non-cooperative game theory and its applications to political science. The goal of the course is to provide students with the background and understanding necessary to read published game-theoretic work in political science journals. To that end, the course covers the basic concepts of game theory, including Nash equilibrium and its main refinements, simultaneous and sequential games, repeated games, evolutionary game theory, and games of incomplete and private information. In addition, we will cover some of the central models used in political science, notably models of public choice (such as the median voter theorem) and models of bargaining. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=PSCI5800301
PSCI 5991-301 Major Figures and Issues in Political Theory Nancy J Hirschmann DRLB 4C2 W 3:30 PM-6:29 PM Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one course may be taken in a given semester. Recent titles have included: Race Development and American International Relations, Hegel and Marx, and Logic of the West. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=PSCI5991301
PSCI 5991-302 Readings in Post-Structuralism Anne Norton PCPE 350 T 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one course may be taken in a given semester. Recent titles have included: Race Development and American International Relations, Hegel and Marx, and Logic of the West.
PSCI 5999-001 Independent Study: International Law Individual research to be taken under the direction of a Political Science faculty member.
PSCI 6120-401 Politics and Social Movements in Contemporary Afro-Latin America Michael G Hanchard MCES 105 W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Over the past two decades there has been an explosion of research into Afro-Latin American populations in South America and the Caribbean. During this period a generation of scholars who were largely unsatisfied with the research methods and normative agendas of many scholars, activists and politicians of prior eras began to pose distinct research questions and methodological approaches to various subject matter. Afro-Latin identification and identity ( as both separate from and entangled with national identity) is a major theme in the new literature. Race, racism and inequality, Afro-Latin involvement in social movements, political parties and other forms of political articulation have also been prominent themes. In previous eras, scholars largely emphasized various iterations of purportedly racial and ostensibly cultural mixture such as Mestizaje and Democracia Racial to explain why race and racism did not play a prominent role in social and political mobilization. Contemporary sociologists and anthropologists, however, have found ways to identify attitudes, behaviors , demographic and socio-economic indicators that belie imagery and ideologies of social and political equality achieved through miscegenation (cultural and physical) in Latin America. AFRC6560401, LALS6560401
PSCI 6200-301 Survey of American Institutions Daniel Q Gillion WILL 316 T 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This course is designed to introduce students to the scholarly study of American political institutions. The course is intended for students who intend to specialize in American politics as well as those who want a basic overview of this work. It is a part of the sequence in the political science department at Penn that serves as the basic preparation for the American politics field exam and more broadly for expertise in the academic study of American politics.
PSCI 6400-301 International Relations Theory Alexander R Weisiger DRLB 4E19 R 8:30 AM-11:29 AM This purpose of this course is two-fold. First, the survey course is designed to introduce students to a wide range of theories of international politics. During the course of the semester we will examine neo-realism, power transition theory, hegemonic stability theory, the modern world system, international regimes and interdependence, the democratic peace, bureaucratic politics, organizational theory, constructivism, and decision making theory. Second, the course will sharpen students' research design skills. The written assignments require students to take the often abstract theories presented in the readings and develop practical research designs for testing hypotheses derived from the theories. The papers will not include data collection or the execution of actual tests. Rather, they will focus on the conceptual problems of designing tests which eliminate competing hypotheses, operationalizing variables, and identifying potential sources of data. Student's grades will be based on five short research designs and discussion leadership. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=PSCI6400301
PSCI 6800-301 Advanced Statistical Analysis Jane Esberg PCPE 225 T 8:30 AM-11:29 AM The objective of this course is to provide Political Science Ph.D. students with statistical tools useful for making inferences about politics. We will cover fundamentals of probability theory, estimation, and hypothesis testing, emphasizing application to research questions in American Politics, positive Political Theory, Comparative Politics, and International Relations.
PSCI 6800-302 Advanced Statistical Analysis Nicolas-Alberto Idrobo-Rincon PCPE 203 W 12:00 PM-12:59 PM The objective of this course is to provide Political Science Ph.D. students with statistical tools useful for making inferences about politics. We will cover fundamentals of probability theory, estimation, and hypothesis testing, emphasizing application to research questions in American Politics, positive Political Theory, Comparative Politics, and International Relations.
PSCI 7991-301 Evolving Traditions in Comparative Politics Rudra Sil BENN 224 M 3:30 PM-6:29 PM Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one section may be given in a semester. Recent titles have included: Interpreting the Canon; State, Self, & Society; U.S. Policy in Europe; and Dissertation Writing.
PSCI 7991-302 Migration and Forced Displacement Guy Grossman BENN 222 F 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one section may be given in a semester. Recent titles have included: Interpreting the Canon; State, Self, & Society; U.S. Policy in Europe; and Dissertation Writing.
PSCI 9950-001 Dissertation Matthew Levendusky Course taken by students completing their Dissertation. Perm Needed From Department
PSCI 9950-002 Dissertation Jeffrey E Green Course taken by students completing their Dissertation.
PSCI 9950-003 Dissertation Nancy J Hirschmann Course taken by students completing their Dissertation.
PSCI 9950-004 Dissertation Tulia G Falleti Course taken by students completing their Dissertation.
PSCI 9950-006 Dissertation Devesh Kapur Course taken by students completing their Dissertation.
PSCI 9950-008 Dissertation Brendan O'Leary Course taken by students completing their Dissertation. Perm Needed From Department
PSCI 9950-009 Dissertation Tulia G Falleti Course taken by students completing their Dissertation.
PSCI 9950-010 Dissertation Avery M Goldstein Course taken by students completing their Dissertation. Perm Needed From Department
PSCI 9950-011 Dissertation Michael Horowitz Course taken by students completing their Dissertation.
PSCI 9950-014 Dissertation Marc N Meredith Course taken by students completing their Dissertation. Perm Needed From Department
PSCI 9950-020 Dissertation Rudra Sil Course taken by students completing their Dissertation. Perm Needed From Department
PSCI 9950-022 Dissertation Ian Steven Lustick Course taken by students completing their Dissertation. Perm Needed From Department
PSCI 9950-024 Dissertation Marie Gottschalk Course taken by students completing their Dissertation.
PSCI 9950-025 Dissertation Rogers M Smith Course taken by students completing their Dissertation.
PSCI 9950-030 Dissertation Anne Norton Course taken by students completing their Dissertation.
PSCI 9950-031 Dissertation Julia C Gray Course taken by students completing their Dissertation. Perm Needed From Department
PSCI 9950-032 Dissertation Daniel Q Gillion Course taken by students completing their Dissertation.
PSCI 9950-033 Dissertation Alexander R Weisiger Course taken by students completing their Dissertation.
PSCI 9950-034 Dissertation Guy Grossman Course taken by students completing their Dissertation.
PSCI 9950-040 Dissertation Tariq Thachil Course taken by students completing their Dissertation.
PSCI 9950-041 Dissertation Edward D Mansfield Course taken by students completing their Dissertation.
PSCI 9950-042 Dissertation Nicholas Sambanis Course taken by students completing their Dissertation.
PSCI 9950-043 Dissertation Dawn L Teele Course taken by students completing their Dissertation.
PSCI 9950-044 Dissertation Michael A Jones-Correa Course taken by students completing their Dissertation.
PSCI 9950-045 Dissertation Daniel Jacob Hopkins Course taken by students completing their Dissertation. Perm Needed From Department
PSCI 9950-046 Dissertation Beth Ann Simmons Course taken by students completing their Dissertation.
PSCI 9950-047 Dissertation Alexander R Weisiger Course taken by students completing their Dissertation.
PSCI 9950-048 Dissertation Course taken by students completing their Dissertation. Perm Needed From Department
PSCI 9950-050 Dissertation Rudra Sil Course taken by students completing their Dissertation.