Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
PSCI 010-301 The Struggle For Amercia's Soul: Evangelical Christians in Amer Politics Michele Francine Margolis M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM Freshmen seminars are small, substantive courses taught by members of the faculty and open only to freshmen. These seminars offer an excellent opportunity to explore areas not represented in high school curricula and to establish relationships with faculty members around areas of mutual interest. See www.college.upenn.edu/admissions/freshmen.php Freshman Seminar
PSCI 107-001 Intro To Data Science MW 01:00 PM-02:00 PM Understanding and interpreting large, quantitative data sets is increasingly central in political and social science. Whether one seeks to understand political communication, international trade, inter-group conflict, or other issues, the availability of large quantities of digital data has revolutionized the study of politics. Nonetheless, most data-related courses focus on statistical estimation, rather than on the related but distinctive problems of data acquisition, management and visualization--in a term, data science. This course addresses that imbalance by focusing squarely on data science. Leaving this course, students will be able to acquire, format, analyze, and visualize various types of political data using the statistical programming language R. This course is not a statistics class, but it will increase the capacity of students to thrive in future statistics classes. While no background in statistics or political science is required, students are expected to be generally familiar with contemporary computing environments (e.g. know how to use a computer) and have a willingness to learn a variety of data science tools. You are encouraged (but certainly not required) to register for both this course and PSCI 338 at the same time, as the courses cover distinct, but complimentary material. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
PSCI 107-201 Intro To Data Science R 09:00 AM-10:00 AM Understanding and interpreting large, quantitative data sets is increasingly central in political and social science. Whether one seeks to understand political communication, international trade, inter-group conflict, or other issues, the availability of large quantities of digital data has revolutionized the study of politics. Nonetheless, most data-related courses focus on statistical estimation, rather than on the related but distinctive problems of data acquisition, management and visualization--in a term, data science. This course addresses that imbalance by focusing squarely on data science. Leaving this course, students will be able to acquire, format, analyze, and visualize various types of political data using the statistical programming language R. This course is not a statistics class, but it will increase the capacity of students to thrive in future statistics classes. While no background in statistics or political science is required, students are expected to be generally familiar with contemporary computing environments (e.g. know how to use a computer) and have a willingness to learn a variety of data science tools. You are encouraged (but certainly not required) to register for both this course and PSCI 338 at the same time, as the courses cover distinct, but complimentary material. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 107-202 Intro To Data Science R 03:00 PM-04:00 PM Understanding and interpreting large, quantitative data sets is increasingly central in political and social science. Whether one seeks to understand political communication, international trade, inter-group conflict, or other issues, the availability of large quantities of digital data has revolutionized the study of politics. Nonetheless, most data-related courses focus on statistical estimation, rather than on the related but distinctive problems of data acquisition, management and visualization--in a term, data science. This course addresses that imbalance by focusing squarely on data science. Leaving this course, students will be able to acquire, format, analyze, and visualize various types of political data using the statistical programming language R. This course is not a statistics class, but it will increase the capacity of students to thrive in future statistics classes. While no background in statistics or political science is required, students are expected to be generally familiar with contemporary computing environments (e.g. know how to use a computer) and have a willingness to learn a variety of data science tools. You are encouraged (but certainly not required) to register for both this course and PSCI 338 at the same time, as the courses cover distinct, but complimentary material. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 107-203 Intro To Data Science R 04:30 PM-05:30 PM Understanding and interpreting large, quantitative data sets is increasingly central in political and social science. Whether one seeks to understand political communication, international trade, inter-group conflict, or other issues, the availability of large quantities of digital data has revolutionized the study of politics. Nonetheless, most data-related courses focus on statistical estimation, rather than on the related but distinctive problems of data acquisition, management and visualization--in a term, data science. This course addresses that imbalance by focusing squarely on data science. Leaving this course, students will be able to acquire, format, analyze, and visualize various types of political data using the statistical programming language R. This course is not a statistics class, but it will increase the capacity of students to thrive in future statistics classes. While no background in statistics or political science is required, students are expected to be generally familiar with contemporary computing environments (e.g. know how to use a computer) and have a willingness to learn a variety of data science tools. You are encouraged (but certainly not required) to register for both this course and PSCI 338 at the same time, as the courses cover distinct, but complimentary material. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 110-601 Comparative Politics Deborah L. Harrold M 05:00 PM-08:00 PM This course is designed to introduce students to comparative political analysis. How can the political behavior, circumstances, institutions, and dynamic patterns of change that people experience in very different societies be analyzed using the same set of concepts and theories? Key themes include nationalism, political culture, democratization, authoritarianism, and the nature of protracted conflict. Society Sector
PSCI 111-401 Gender and Elections Dawn L Teele TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course tackles four theoretical and empirical challenges related to gender and political equality: the extension of citizenship rights and voting rights to women; the problem of women's persistent under-representation in politics; the nature of the gender gap in preferences across time and space; and the possibilities for substantive representation. We will focus about half the class on the US (contrasting the experiences of white and black women and men in politics) and the other half on other countries, detailing how different party systems, variation in electoral rules (like proportional representation), and institutional innovations such as gender quotas, enable or constrain gender equality in politics. GSWS111401 Cross Cultural Analysis
PSCI 130-001 Intro To Amer Politics Rogers M Smith MW 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Society Sector Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
PSCI 130-201 Intro To Amer Politics W 04:00 PM-05:00 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 130-202 Intro To Amer Politics W 04:00 PM-05:00 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 130-203 Intro To Amer Politics R 03:00 PM-04:00 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 130-204 Intro To Amer Politics R 10:30 AM-11:30 AM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 130-205 Intro To Amer Politics F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 130-206 Intro To Amer Politics F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 130-207 Intro To Amer Politics W 03:00 PM-04:00 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 130-208 Intro To Amer Politics R 09:30 AM-10:30 AM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 130-209 Intro To Amer Politics R 04:00 PM-05:00 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the national institutions and political processes of American government. What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the American Republic? How does American public policy get made, who makes it, and who benefits? Is a constitutional fabric woven in 1787 good enough for today? How, if at all, should American government be changed, and why? What is politics and why bother to study it? If these sorts of questions interest you, then this course will be a congenial home. It is designed to explore such questions while teaching students the basics of American politics and government. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 144-401 Communism Mitchell Orenstein TR 09:00 AM-10:30 AM The rise and fall of Communism dominated the history of the short twentieth century from the Russian revolution of 1917 to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. As a system of government, Communism is more or less dead, but its utopian ideals of liberation from exploitation and want live on. Communism remains the one political-economic system that presented, for a time, an alternative to global capitalism. In this course, students will gain an introduction to socialist and Communist political thought and explore Communist political and economic regimes - their successes and failures, critics and dissidents, efforts at reform, and causes of collapse. We will learn about the remnants of Communism in China, North Korea, and Cuba and efforts of contemporary theorists to imagine a future for Communism. REES134401 Society Sector
PSCI 150-001 Intro To Intl Relations Edward D Mansfield MW 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Society Sector Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
PSCI 150-201 Intro To Intl Relations W 03:00 PM-04:00 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 150-202 Intro To Intl Relations W 03:00 PM-04:00 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 150-203 Intro To Intl Relations R 04:30 PM-05:30 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 150-204 Intro To Intl Relations R 04:30 PM-05:30 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 150-205 Intro To Intl Relations T 02:00 PM-03:00 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 150-206 Intro To Intl Relations R 03:00 PM-04:00 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 150-207 Intro To Intl Relations T 02:00 PM-03:00 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 150-208 Intro To Intl Relations W 09:00 AM-10:00 AM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 150-209 Intro To Intl Relations R 03:00 PM-04:00 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 150-210 Intro To Intl Relations F 02:00 PM-03:00 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 150-211 Intro To Intl Relations T 04:30 PM-05:30 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 150-212 Intro To Intl Relations T 03:00 PM-04:00 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 150-213 Intro To Intl Relations R 09:00 AM-10:00 AM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 150-214 Intro To Intl Relations W 04:00 PM-05:00 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 150-215 Intro To Intl Relations W 04:00 PM-05:00 PM This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 152-001 International Pol. Econ. Mark A Pollack MW 09:00 AM-10:00 AM This course examines the politics of international economic relations. The course will analyze the interplay between politics and economics in three broad areas: international trade, international finance, and economic development. In each section, we will first discuss economic theories that explain the causes and consequences of international commerce, capital flows, and economic growth. We will then explore how political interests, institutions, and ideas alter these predictions, examining both historical examples and current policy debates. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
PSCI 152-201 International Pol. Econ. W 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course examines the politics of international economic relations. The course will analyze the interplay between politics and economics in three broad areas: international trade, international finance, and economic development. In each section, we will first discuss economic theories that explain the causes and consequences of international commerce, capital flows, and economic growth. We will then explore how political interests, institutions, and ideas alter these predictions, examining both historical examples and current policy debates. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 152-202 International Pol. Econ. F 09:00 AM-10:00 AM This course examines the politics of international economic relations. The course will analyze the interplay between politics and economics in three broad areas: international trade, international finance, and economic development. In each section, we will first discuss economic theories that explain the causes and consequences of international commerce, capital flows, and economic growth. We will then explore how political interests, institutions, and ideas alter these predictions, examining both historical examples and current policy debates. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 152-203 International Pol. Econ. F 09:00 AM-10:00 AM This course examines the politics of international economic relations. The course will analyze the interplay between politics and economics in three broad areas: international trade, international finance, and economic development. In each section, we will first discuss economic theories that explain the causes and consequences of international commerce, capital flows, and economic growth. We will then explore how political interests, institutions, and ideas alter these predictions, examining both historical examples and current policy debates. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 152-204 International Pol. Econ. F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course examines the politics of international economic relations. The course will analyze the interplay between politics and economics in three broad areas: international trade, international finance, and economic development. In each section, we will first discuss economic theories that explain the causes and consequences of international commerce, capital flows, and economic growth. We will then explore how political interests, institutions, and ideas alter these predictions, examining both historical examples and current policy debates. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 152-205 International Pol. Econ. F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This course examines the politics of international economic relations. The course will analyze the interplay between politics and economics in three broad areas: international trade, international finance, and economic development. In each section, we will first discuss economic theories that explain the causes and consequences of international commerce, capital flows, and economic growth. We will then explore how political interests, institutions, and ideas alter these predictions, examining both historical examples and current policy debates. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 152-206 International Pol. Econ. R 01:30 PM-02:30 PM This course examines the politics of international economic relations. The course will analyze the interplay between politics and economics in three broad areas: international trade, international finance, and economic development. In each section, we will first discuss economic theories that explain the causes and consequences of international commerce, capital flows, and economic growth. We will then explore how political interests, institutions, and ideas alter these predictions, examining both historical examples and current policy debates. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 180-001 Ancient Political Though Jeffrey E. Green MW 03:00 PM-04:00 PM Through reading texts of Plato (Socrates), Aristotle, Augustine and Aquinas, the student encounters a range of political ideas deeply challenging to--and possibly corrosive of--today's dominant democratic liberalism. Can classical and medieval thinking offer insight into modern impasses in political morality? Is such ancient thinking plausible, useful, or dangerous? History & Tradition Sector Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
PSCI 180-201 Ancient Political Though W 04:00 PM-05:00 PM Through reading texts of Plato (Socrates), Aristotle, Augustine and Aquinas, the student encounters a range of political ideas deeply challenging to--and possibly corrosive of--today's dominant democratic liberalism. Can classical and medieval thinking offer insight into modern impasses in political morality? Is such ancient thinking plausible, useful, or dangerous? Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 180-202 Ancient Political Though R 10:30 AM-11:30 AM Through reading texts of Plato (Socrates), Aristotle, Augustine and Aquinas, the student encounters a range of political ideas deeply challenging to--and possibly corrosive of--today's dominant democratic liberalism. Can classical and medieval thinking offer insight into modern impasses in political morality? Is such ancient thinking plausible, useful, or dangerous? Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 180-203 Ancient Political Though R 01:30 PM-02:30 PM Through reading texts of Plato (Socrates), Aristotle, Augustine and Aquinas, the student encounters a range of political ideas deeply challenging to--and possibly corrosive of--today's dominant democratic liberalism. Can classical and medieval thinking offer insight into modern impasses in political morality? Is such ancient thinking plausible, useful, or dangerous? Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 180-204 Ancient Political Though W 05:00 PM-06:00 PM Through reading texts of Plato (Socrates), Aristotle, Augustine and Aquinas, the student encounters a range of political ideas deeply challenging to--and possibly corrosive of--today's dominant democratic liberalism. Can classical and medieval thinking offer insight into modern impasses in political morality? Is such ancient thinking plausible, useful, or dangerous? Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 180-205 Ancient Political Though R 03:00 PM-04:00 PM Through reading texts of Plato (Socrates), Aristotle, Augustine and Aquinas, the student encounters a range of political ideas deeply challenging to--and possibly corrosive of--today's dominant democratic liberalism. Can classical and medieval thinking offer insight into modern impasses in political morality? Is such ancient thinking plausible, useful, or dangerous? Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 180-206 Ancient Political Though R 09:00 AM-10:00 AM Through reading texts of Plato (Socrates), Aristotle, Augustine and Aquinas, the student encounters a range of political ideas deeply challenging to--and possibly corrosive of--today's dominant democratic liberalism. Can classical and medieval thinking offer insight into modern impasses in political morality? Is such ancient thinking plausible, useful, or dangerous? Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 181-601 Modern Political Thought Isaac Gabriel Salgado W 05:00 PM-08:00 PM This course will provide an overview of major figures and themes of modern political thought. We will focus on themes and questions pertinent to political theory in the modern era, particularly focusing on the relationship of the individual to community, society, and state. Although the emergence of the individual as a central moral, political, and conceptual category arguably began in earlier eras, it is in the seventeenth century that it takes firm hold in defining the state, political institutions, moral thinking, and social relations. The centrality of "the individual" has created difficulties, even paradoxes, for community and social relations, and political theorists have struggled to reconicle those throughout the modern era. We will consider the political forms that emerged out of those struggles, as well as the changed and distinctly "modern" conceptualizations of political theory such as freedom, responsibilty, justice, rights and obligations, as central categories for organizing moral and political life. History & Tradition Sector
PSCI 183-001 American Polit Thought Carlin P. Romano MW 01:00 PM-02:00 PM Whether America begins with the Puritans and the Mayflower Compact, or with the Declaration of Independence and the Revolution, it is founded in resistance to empire. In the generations between, Americans have desired, dreaded and debated empire. This course will focus on empire and imperialism in American political thought. We will read primary texts addressing empire: from the departure and dissent of the Puritans, and Burke's Speech on Conciliation with the Colonies, to twentieth and twenty-first century debates over America's role in the world. These texts will include political pamphlets and speeches, poetry, novels, policy papers and film. Humanities & Social Science Sector
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
PSCI 183-201 American Polit Thought W 02:00 PM-03:00 PM Whether America begins with the Puritans and the Mayflower Compact, or with the Declaration of Independence and the Revolution, it is founded in resistance to empire. In the generations between, Americans have desired, dreaded and debated empire. This course will focus on empire and imperialism in American political thought. We will read primary texts addressing empire: from the departure and dissent of the Puritans, and Burke's Speech on Conciliation with the Colonies, to twentieth and twenty-first century debates over America's role in the world. These texts will include political pamphlets and speeches, poetry, novels, policy papers and film. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 183-202 American Polit Thought W 03:00 PM-04:00 PM Whether America begins with the Puritans and the Mayflower Compact, or with the Declaration of Independence and the Revolution, it is founded in resistance to empire. In the generations between, Americans have desired, dreaded and debated empire. This course will focus on empire and imperialism in American political thought. We will read primary texts addressing empire: from the departure and dissent of the Puritans, and Burke's Speech on Conciliation with the Colonies, to twentieth and twenty-first century debates over America's role in the world. These texts will include political pamphlets and speeches, poetry, novels, policy papers and film. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 183-203 American Polit Thought R 10:30 AM-11:30 AM Whether America begins with the Puritans and the Mayflower Compact, or with the Declaration of Independence and the Revolution, it is founded in resistance to empire. In the generations between, Americans have desired, dreaded and debated empire. This course will focus on empire and imperialism in American political thought. We will read primary texts addressing empire: from the departure and dissent of the Puritans, and Burke's Speech on Conciliation with the Colonies, to twentieth and twenty-first century debates over America's role in the world. These texts will include political pamphlets and speeches, poetry, novels, policy papers and film. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 183-204 American Polit Thought R 01:30 PM-02:30 PM Whether America begins with the Puritans and the Mayflower Compact, or with the Declaration of Independence and the Revolution, it is founded in resistance to empire. In the generations between, Americans have desired, dreaded and debated empire. This course will focus on empire and imperialism in American political thought. We will read primary texts addressing empire: from the departure and dissent of the Puritans, and Burke's Speech on Conciliation with the Colonies, to twentieth and twenty-first century debates over America's role in the world. These texts will include political pamphlets and speeches, poetry, novels, policy papers and film. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 183-205 American Polit Thought R 04:30 PM-05:30 PM Whether America begins with the Puritans and the Mayflower Compact, or with the Declaration of Independence and the Revolution, it is founded in resistance to empire. In the generations between, Americans have desired, dreaded and debated empire. This course will focus on empire and imperialism in American political thought. We will read primary texts addressing empire: from the departure and dissent of the Puritans, and Burke's Speech on Conciliation with the Colonies, to twentieth and twenty-first century debates over America's role in the world. These texts will include political pamphlets and speeches, poetry, novels, policy papers and film. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 183-206 American Polit Thought W 05:00 PM-06:00 PM Whether America begins with the Puritans and the Mayflower Compact, or with the Declaration of Independence and the Revolution, it is founded in resistance to empire. In the generations between, Americans have desired, dreaded and debated empire. This course will focus on empire and imperialism in American political thought. We will read primary texts addressing empire: from the departure and dissent of the Puritans, and Burke's Speech on Conciliation with the Colonies, to twentieth and twenty-first century debates over America's role in the world. These texts will include political pamphlets and speeches, poetry, novels, policy papers and film. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 210-001 Contemp African Politics Guy Grossman MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This class provides an introduction to contemporary African politics. The core questions that motivate the course are (i) to what extent are political outcomes in contemporary Africa a consequence of its history, culture and geography? (ii.) Why are state structures and institutions weaker in Africa than elsewhere? (iii.) What accounts for Africa's relatively slow economic growth? (iv.) Why have some African countries been plagued by high levels of political violence while others have not? (v.) What explains the behavior of key African actors: parties or politicians? Cross Cultural Analysis
PSCI 211-001 Pol in Contemp Mid East Robert Vitalis MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This course is an introduction to the most prominent historical, cultural, institutional, and ideological features of Middle Eastern politics. Typical of the questions we shall address are why processes of modernization and economic change have not produced liberal democracies, why Islamic movements have gained enormous strength in some countries and not others, why conflicts in the region--between Israel and the Arabs, Iran and Iraq, or inside of Lebanon--have been so bitter and protracted; why the era of military coups was brought to an end but transitions to democracy have been difficult to achieve; why Arab unity has been so elusive and yet so insistent a theme; and why oil wealth in the Gulf, in the Arabian Peninsula, and in North Africa, has not produced industrialized or self-sustaining economic growth. Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
PSCI 211-201 Pol in Contemp Mid East W 02:00 PM-03:00 PM This course is an introduction to the most prominent historical, cultural, institutional, and ideological features of Middle Eastern politics. Typical of the questions we shall address are why processes of modernization and economic change have not produced liberal democracies, why Islamic movements have gained enormous strength in some countries and not others, why conflicts in the region--between Israel and the Arabs, Iran and Iraq, or inside of Lebanon--have been so bitter and protracted; why the era of military coups was brought to an end but transitions to democracy have been difficult to achieve; why Arab unity has been so elusive and yet so insistent a theme; and why oil wealth in the Gulf, in the Arabian Peninsula, and in North Africa, has not produced industrialized or self-sustaining economic growth. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 211-202 Pol in Contemp Mid East W 05:00 PM-06:00 PM This course is an introduction to the most prominent historical, cultural, institutional, and ideological features of Middle Eastern politics. Typical of the questions we shall address are why processes of modernization and economic change have not produced liberal democracies, why Islamic movements have gained enormous strength in some countries and not others, why conflicts in the region--between Israel and the Arabs, Iran and Iraq, or inside of Lebanon--have been so bitter and protracted; why the era of military coups was brought to an end but transitions to democracy have been difficult to achieve; why Arab unity has been so elusive and yet so insistent a theme; and why oil wealth in the Gulf, in the Arabian Peninsula, and in North Africa, has not produced industrialized or self-sustaining economic growth. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 211-203 Pol in Contemp Mid East F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This course is an introduction to the most prominent historical, cultural, institutional, and ideological features of Middle Eastern politics. Typical of the questions we shall address are why processes of modernization and economic change have not produced liberal democracies, why Islamic movements have gained enormous strength in some countries and not others, why conflicts in the region--between Israel and the Arabs, Iran and Iraq, or inside of Lebanon--have been so bitter and protracted; why the era of military coups was brought to an end but transitions to democracy have been difficult to achieve; why Arab unity has been so elusive and yet so insistent a theme; and why oil wealth in the Gulf, in the Arabian Peninsula, and in North Africa, has not produced industrialized or self-sustaining economic growth. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 219-001 Chinese Politics Yue Hou MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This lecture course introduces students to the politics of the Peoples Republic of China. Complementing offerings in other departments, this course emphasizes events in the period since the Chinese Communist Party established its regime in 1949. In addition to surveying the political history of contemporary China, we will assess the meaning of these events by drawing upon theories about the nature and significance of ideology and organization in communist regimes, factionalism and its relationship to policy formulation and implementation, and general issues of political and economic development. Although the principal focus is on the domestic politics of the PRC, the course includes several lectures examining Chinas international relations. Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
PSCI 219-201 Chinese Politics Jiayan Huang W 01:00 PM-02:00 PM This lecture course introduces students to the politics of the Peoples Republic of China. Complementing offerings in other departments, this course emphasizes events in the period since the Chinese Communist Party established its regime in 1949. In addition to surveying the political history of contemporary China, we will assess the meaning of these events by drawing upon theories about the nature and significance of ideology and organization in communist regimes, factionalism and its relationship to policy formulation and implementation, and general issues of political and economic development. Although the principal focus is on the domestic politics of the PRC, the course includes several lectures examining Chinas international relations. Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 219-202 Chinese Politics Jiayi Huang W 03:00 PM-04:00 PM This lecture course introduces students to the politics of the Peoples Republic of China. Complementing offerings in other departments, this course emphasizes events in the period since the Chinese Communist Party established its regime in 1949. In addition to surveying the political history of contemporary China, we will assess the meaning of these events by drawing upon theories about the nature and significance of ideology and organization in communist regimes, factionalism and its relationship to policy formulation and implementation, and general issues of political and economic development. Although the principal focus is on the domestic politics of the PRC, the course includes several lectures examining Chinas international relations. Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 219-203 Chinese Politics Jiayi Huang W 04:00 PM-05:00 PM This lecture course introduces students to the politics of the Peoples Republic of China. Complementing offerings in other departments, this course emphasizes events in the period since the Chinese Communist Party established its regime in 1949. In addition to surveying the political history of contemporary China, we will assess the meaning of these events by drawing upon theories about the nature and significance of ideology and organization in communist regimes, factionalism and its relationship to policy formulation and implementation, and general issues of political and economic development. Although the principal focus is on the domestic politics of the PRC, the course includes several lectures examining Chinas international relations. Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 230-001 Public Opin & Amer Democ Michele Francine Margolis MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This course examines public opinion in the American political system. We will discuss how to measure public opinion, how citizens forumlate opinions, and the role of public opinion in campaigns, elections, and policymaking. We will also consider normative questions, including the role opinion should play in American democracy. Additionally, over the course of the semester we will track public opinion polls related to ongoing elections as well as develop analytical skills to answer questions using public opinion. Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
PSCI 230-201 Public Opin & Amer Democ W 04:00 PM-05:00 PM This course examines public opinion in the American political system. We will discuss how to measure public opinion, how citizens forumlate opinions, and the role of public opinion in campaigns, elections, and policymaking. We will also consider normative questions, including the role opinion should play in American democracy. Additionally, over the course of the semester we will track public opinion polls related to ongoing elections as well as develop analytical skills to answer questions using public opinion. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 230-202 Public Opin & Amer Democ W 05:00 PM-06:00 PM This course examines public opinion in the American political system. We will discuss how to measure public opinion, how citizens forumlate opinions, and the role of public opinion in campaigns, elections, and policymaking. We will also consider normative questions, including the role opinion should play in American democracy. Additionally, over the course of the semester we will track public opinion polls related to ongoing elections as well as develop analytical skills to answer questions using public opinion. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 230-203 Public Opin & Amer Democ R 10:30 AM-11:30 AM This course examines public opinion in the American political system. We will discuss how to measure public opinion, how citizens forumlate opinions, and the role of public opinion in campaigns, elections, and policymaking. We will also consider normative questions, including the role opinion should play in American democracy. Additionally, over the course of the semester we will track public opinion polls related to ongoing elections as well as develop analytical skills to answer questions using public opinion. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 231-401 Race and Ethnic Politics Daniel Q Gillion TR 10:30 AM-11:30 AM This course examines the role of race and ethnicity in the political discourse through a comparative survey of recent literature on the historical and contemporary political experiences of the four major minority groups (Blacks or African Americans, American Indians, Latinos or Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans). A few of the key topics will include assimilation and acculturation seen in the Asian American community, understanding the political direction of Black America in a pre and post Civil Rights era, and assessing the emergence of Hispanics as the largest minority group and the political impact of this demographic change. Throughout the semester, the course will introduce students to significant minority legislation, political behavior, social movements, litigation/court rulings, media, and various forms of public opinion that have shaped the history of racial and ethnic minority relations in this country. Readings are drawn from books and articles written by contemporary political scientists. AFRC232401, LALS232401 Cultural Diversity in the US Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
PSCI 231-402 Race and Ethnic Politics F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course examines the role of race and ethnicity in the political discourse through a comparative survey of recent literature on the historical and contemporary political experiences of the four major minority groups (Blacks or African Americans, American Indians, Latinos or Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans). A few of the key topics will include assimilation and acculturation seen in the Asian American community, understanding the political direction of Black America in a pre and post Civil Rights era, and assessing the emergence of Hispanics as the largest minority group and the political impact of this demographic change. Throughout the semester, the course will introduce students to significant minority legislation, political behavior, social movements, litigation/court rulings, media, and various forms of public opinion that have shaped the history of racial and ethnic minority relations in this country. Readings are drawn from books and articles written by contemporary political scientists. AFRC232402 Cultural Diversity in the US Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 231-403 Race and Ethnic Politics F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This course examines the role of race and ethnicity in the political discourse through a comparative survey of recent literature on the historical and contemporary political experiences of the four major minority groups (Blacks or African Americans, American Indians, Latinos or Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans). A few of the key topics will include assimilation and acculturation seen in the Asian American community, understanding the political direction of Black America in a pre and post Civil Rights era, and assessing the emergence of Hispanics as the largest minority group and the political impact of this demographic change. Throughout the semester, the course will introduce students to significant minority legislation, political behavior, social movements, litigation/court rulings, media, and various forms of public opinion that have shaped the history of racial and ethnic minority relations in this country. Readings are drawn from books and articles written by contemporary political scientists. AFRC232403 Cultural Diversity in the US Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 231-404 Race and Ethnic Politics M 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course examines the role of race and ethnicity in the political discourse through a comparative survey of recent literature on the historical and contemporary political experiences of the four major minority groups (Blacks or African Americans, American Indians, Latinos or Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans). A few of the key topics will include assimilation and acculturation seen in the Asian American community, understanding the political direction of Black America in a pre and post Civil Rights era, and assessing the emergence of Hispanics as the largest minority group and the political impact of this demographic change. Throughout the semester, the course will introduce students to significant minority legislation, political behavior, social movements, litigation/court rulings, media, and various forms of public opinion that have shaped the history of racial and ethnic minority relations in this country. Readings are drawn from books and articles written by contemporary political scientists. AFRC232404 Cultural Diversity in the US Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 232-401 Intro To Political Comm Kathleen Hall Jamieson T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This course is an introduction to the field of political communication and conceptual approaches to analyzing communication in various forms, including advertising, speech making, campaign debates, and candidates' and office-holders' uses of social media and efforts to frame news. The focus of this course is on the interplay in the U.S. between media and politics. The course includes a history of campaign practices from the 1952 presidential contest through the election of 2020. COMM226401
PSCI 252-001 War,Strategy & Politics Michael Horowitz TR 10:30 AM-11:30 AM This class examines the strategy and politics of warfare, focusing on the way actors plan military campaigns and the factors that are likely to lead to victory and defeat. The course readings center in particular on the factors driving changes in warfare and civil-military relations. The course will cover a wide range of topics from theories of war-fighting to historical military campaigns to insurgency warfare, terrorism, and the future of war. Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
PSCI 252-201 War,Strategy & Politics R 01:30 PM-02:30 PM This class examines the strategy and politics of warfare, focusing on the way actors plan military campaigns and the factors that are likely to lead to victory and defeat. The course readings center in particular on the factors driving changes in warfare and civil-military relations. The course will cover a wide range of topics from theories of war-fighting to historical military campaigns to insurgency warfare, terrorism, and the future of war. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 252-202 War,Strategy & Politics R 05:00 PM-06:00 PM This class examines the strategy and politics of warfare, focusing on the way actors plan military campaigns and the factors that are likely to lead to victory and defeat. The course readings center in particular on the factors driving changes in warfare and civil-military relations. The course will cover a wide range of topics from theories of war-fighting to historical military campaigns to insurgency warfare, terrorism, and the future of war. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 252-203 War,Strategy & Politics F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This class examines the strategy and politics of warfare, focusing on the way actors plan military campaigns and the factors that are likely to lead to victory and defeat. The course readings center in particular on the factors driving changes in warfare and civil-military relations. The course will cover a wide range of topics from theories of war-fighting to historical military campaigns to insurgency warfare, terrorism, and the future of war. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 271-401 Classic American Constitutional Law Rogers M Smith MW 03:00 PM-04:00 PM This course explores the creation and transformations of the American constitutional system's structures and goals from the nation's founding through the period of Progressive reforms, the rise of the Jim Crow system, and the Spanish American War. Issues include the division of powers between state and national governments, and the branches of the federal government; economic powers of private actors and government regulators; the authority of governments to enforce or transform racial and gender hierarchies; and the extent of religious and expressive freedoms and rights of persons accused of crimes. We will pay special attention to the changing role of the Supreme Court and its decisions in interpreting and shaping American constitutionalism, and we will also read legislative and executive constitutional arguments, party platforms, and other influential statements of American constitutional thought. AFRC269401 Cultural Diversity in the US Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
PSCI 271-402 Classic American Constitutional Law T 04:30 PM-05:30 PM This course explores the creation and transformations of the American constitutional system's structures and goals from the nation's founding through the period of Progressive reforms, the rise of the Jim Crow system, and the Spanish American War. Issues include the division of powers between state and national governments, and the branches of the federal government; economic powers of private actors and government regulators; the authority of governments to enforce or transform racial and gender hierarchies; and the extent of religious and expressive freedoms and rights of persons accused of crimes. We will pay special attention to the changing role of the Supreme Court and its decisions in interpreting and shaping American constitutionalism, and we will also read legislative and executive constitutional arguments, party platforms, and other influential statements of American constitutional thought. AFRC269402 Cultural Diversity in the US Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 271-403 Classic American Constitutional Law W 04:00 PM-05:00 PM This course explores the creation and transformations of the American constitutional system's structures and goals from the nation's founding through the period of Progressive reforms, the rise of the Jim Crow system, and the Spanish American War. Issues include the division of powers between state and national governments, and the branches of the federal government; economic powers of private actors and government regulators; the authority of governments to enforce or transform racial and gender hierarchies; and the extent of religious and expressive freedoms and rights of persons accused of crimes. We will pay special attention to the changing role of the Supreme Court and its decisions in interpreting and shaping American constitutionalism, and we will also read legislative and executive constitutional arguments, party platforms, and other influential statements of American constitutional thought. AFRC269403 Cultural Diversity in the US Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 271-404 Classic American Constitutional Law R 03:30 PM-04:30 PM This course explores the creation and transformations of the American constitutional system's structures and goals from the nation's founding through the period of Progressive reforms, the rise of the Jim Crow system, and the Spanish American War. Issues include the division of powers between state and national governments, and the branches of the federal government; economic powers of private actors and government regulators; the authority of governments to enforce or transform racial and gender hierarchies; and the extent of religious and expressive freedoms and rights of persons accused of crimes. We will pay special attention to the changing role of the Supreme Court and its decisions in interpreting and shaping American constitutionalism, and we will also read legislative and executive constitutional arguments, party platforms, and other influential statements of American constitutional thought. AFRC269404 Cultural Diversity in the US Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 320-401 Who Gets Elected and Why Edward G Rendell M 06:00 PM-09:00 PM What does it take to get elected to office? What are the key elements of a successful political campaign? What are the crucial issues guiding campaigns and elections in the U.S. at the beginning of the 21st century? This class will address the process and results of electoral politics at the local, state, and federal levels. Course participants will study the stages and strategies of running for public office and will discuss the various influences on getting elected, including: Campaign finance and fundraising, demographics, polling, the media, staffing, economics, and party organization. Each week we will be joined by guest speakers who are nationally recognized professionals, with expertise in different areas of the campaign and election process. Students will also analyze campaign case studies and the career of the instructor himself. Edward G. Rendell is the former Mayor of Philadelphia, former Chair of the Democratic National Committee, and former Governor of Pennsylvania. A note if you are not able to gain a seat in this course: Please write to Professor Fay Walker (listed in the Penn Directory) with your name, year of study, and major in order to be added to a waitlist. The professors will be able to register many waitlisted students in the first week of the semester, but only after the first class session on Monday Sept. 9th, 6pm, in Cohen Hall Room 402. Waitlisted students are encouraged not to miss the first class. GAFL509401, URBS320401
PSCI 328-401 Diplomacy in the Americas: the Penn Model Oas Program Catherine E.M. Bartch T 04:30 PM-06:00 PM
R 04:30 PM-06:00 PM
"Diplomacy in the Americas" an academically based community service course in which students work with Philadelphia and Norristown public school students to explore solutions to critical problems facing the Americas. Entrenched political, economic, and social inequality, combined with environmental degradation, weak institutions, pervasive health epidemics, weapon proliferation, and other issues pose formidable hurdles for strengthening democratic ideals and institutions. The Organization of the American States (OAS), the world's oldest regional organization, is uniquely poised to confront these challenges. "Diplomacy in the Americas" guides students through the process of writing policy resolutions as though the students were Organization of the American States (OAS) diplomats, basing their research and proposals on democracy, development, security, and human rights - the four pillars of the OAS. Students will also read literature about what it means to educate for a democracy and global citizenry, and they will have the opportunity to turn theory into practice by creating and executing curriculum to teach and mentor the high school students through interactive and experiential pedagogies. LALS328401 An Academically Based Community Serv Course
PSCI 330-301 Piw: Core Seminar: Conducting Public Policy Research in Washington Deirdre Martinez This seminar is taught in Washington D.C. for students enrolled in the Washington Semester Program. It includes an orientation to observation and research in the Washington Community and a major independent research project on the politics of governance. Permission Needed From Department
PSCI 333-401 Political Polling David J Dutwin R 03:00 PM-06:00 PM Political polls are a central feature of elections and are ubiquitously employed to understand and explain voter intentions and public opinion. This course will examine political polling by focusing on four main areas of consideration. First, what is the role of political polls in a functioning democracy? This area will explore the theoretical justifications for polling as a representation of public opinion. Second, the course will explore the business and use of political polling, including media coverage of polls, use by politicians for political strategy and messaging, and the impact polls have on elections specifically and politics more broadly. The third area will focus on the nuts and bolts of election and political polls, specifically with regard to exploring traditional questions and scales used for political measurement; the construction and considerations of likely voter models; measurement of the horserace; and samples and modes used for election polls. The course will additionally cover a fourth area of special topics, which will include exit polling, prediction markets, polling aggregation, and other topics. It is not necessary for students to have any specialized mathematical or statistical background for this course. Equivalent R based course if prerequisite not met. COMM393401
PSCI 338-001 Statistical Methods Psci Marc N. Meredith MW 10:00 AM-11:00 AM The goal of this class is to expose students to the process by which quantitative political science research is conducted. The class will take us down three separate, but related tracks. Track one will teach some basic tools necessary to conduct quantitative political science research. Topics covered will include descriptive statistics, sampling, probability and statistical theory, and regression analysis. However, conducting empirical research requires that we actually be able to apply these tools. Thus, track two will teach us how to implement some of these basic tools using the computer program R. However, if we want to implement these tools, we also need to be able to develop hypotheses that we want to test. Thus, track three will teach some basics in research design. Topics will include independent and dependent variables, generating testable hypotheses, and issues in causalit You are encouraged to register for both this course an PSCI 107 at the same time, as the courses cover distin but complementary, material. But there are no prerequi nor is registering for PSCI 107 necessary, in order to take this course. The class satisfies the College of A Science Quantitative Data Analysis (QDA) requirement. Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
PSCI 338-201 Statistical Methods Psci R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM The goal of this class is to expose students to the process by which quantitative political science research is conducted. The class will take us down three separate, but related tracks. Track one will teach some basic tools necessary to conduct quantitative political science research. Topics covered will include descriptive statistics, sampling, probability and statistical theory, and regression analysis. However, conducting empirical research requires that we actually be able to apply these tools. Thus, track two will teach us how to implement some of these basic tools using the computer program R. However, if we want to implement these tools, we also need to be able to develop hypotheses that we want to test. Thus, track three will teach some basics in research design. Topics will include independent and dependent variables, generating testable hypotheses, and issues in causalit You are encouraged to register for both this course an PSCI 107 at the same time, as the courses cover distin but complementary, material. But there are no prerequi nor is registering for PSCI 107 necessary, in order to take this course. The class satisfies the College of A Science Quantitative Data Analysis (QDA) requirement. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 338-202 Statistical Methods Psci F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM The goal of this class is to expose students to the process by which quantitative political science research is conducted. The class will take us down three separate, but related tracks. Track one will teach some basic tools necessary to conduct quantitative political science research. Topics covered will include descriptive statistics, sampling, probability and statistical theory, and regression analysis. However, conducting empirical research requires that we actually be able to apply these tools. Thus, track two will teach us how to implement some of these basic tools using the computer program R. However, if we want to implement these tools, we also need to be able to develop hypotheses that we want to test. Thus, track three will teach some basics in research design. Topics will include independent and dependent variables, generating testable hypotheses, and issues in causalit You are encouraged to register for both this course an PSCI 107 at the same time, as the courses cover distin but complementary, material. But there are no prerequi nor is registering for PSCI 107 necessary, in order to take this course. The class satisfies the College of A Science Quantitative Data Analysis (QDA) requirement. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 338-203 Statistical Methods Psci F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM The goal of this class is to expose students to the process by which quantitative political science research is conducted. The class will take us down three separate, but related tracks. Track one will teach some basic tools necessary to conduct quantitative political science research. Topics covered will include descriptive statistics, sampling, probability and statistical theory, and regression analysis. However, conducting empirical research requires that we actually be able to apply these tools. Thus, track two will teach us how to implement some of these basic tools using the computer program R. However, if we want to implement these tools, we also need to be able to develop hypotheses that we want to test. Thus, track three will teach some basics in research design. Topics will include independent and dependent variables, generating testable hypotheses, and issues in causalit You are encouraged to register for both this course an PSCI 107 at the same time, as the courses cover distin but complementary, material. But there are no prerequi nor is registering for PSCI 107 necessary, in order to take this course. The class satisfies the College of A Science Quantitative Data Analysis (QDA) requirement. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 353-301 International Borders Beth Ann Simmons T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Borders are increasingly contested in global order, yet function as distinct markers of statehood and sovereignty. How states control their borders physically is an important manifestation of their sovereign rights. In this course, we explore the meaning attached to international borders for two allies in very different regions of the world, Turkey and the United States. We inquire into the role that national territorial and international borders shave come to play in their national identities. We will place these two countries in the context of their "neighborhoods" to understand the threats and opportunities seem to attend border spaces. With their extensive coastlines and land boundaries, these states are subject in different ways to external influences. Both have extensive trade relations with the rest of the world, as well as extensive illicit economies along their borders. The United States is "a nation of immigrants" currently questioning the value of immigration. Turkey is host to the largest number of refugees in the world. Each state faces its own version of an ontological crisis, as they decide how to engage, filter or deflect extraterritorial flows and influences. These developments raise intense issues of identities and boundaries - in particular the question of how different societies engage in border protection. This seminar focuses on the comparative experiences of Turkey and the USA in their methods of maintaining borders and dealing with anxiety about uncontrolled transnational flows of products and people across their borders. The seminar explores how security and insecurity are understood, produced, and implemented in the form of border security policies. The comparative study of American and Turkish border control will uncover both similarities in the framing of border policies, but also distinct differences on how these two countries deal with border security. The international focus will enable students to appreciate the global aspect of border security issues, and research multiple questions on the extent to which what is facing the USA in terms of border security is not unique on its own. This course will be co-taught with a professor and students at Sabanci University. We will overlap with their classroom for roughly half of out three hour seminar meeting, and the professors will co-teach the course. Common readings will be discussed each week, but each Professor will assign additional readings of her choice to complement the common discussions. In the Penn seminar, we will aim to produce a research paper, so in addition to discussing the substantive readings, we will concentrate on formulating interesting research questions, Permission Needed From Department
Penn Global Seminar
PSCI 358-401 International Law Beth Ann Simmons MW 03:00 PM-04:30 PM Do legal rules really affect international politics? This course explores why international law has the form and content it does, and its role in shaping how states and other actors behave. It combines law and social science to examine important issues of the day, including security policies, human rights, and economic relationships. LAW708401 Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
PSCI 358-402 International Law Gino Nicolas Pauselli R 05:00 PM-06:00 PM Do legal rules really affect international politics? This course explores why international law has the form and content it does, and its role in shaping how states and other actors behave. It combines law and social science to examine important issues of the day, including security policies, human rights, and economic relationships. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 358-403 International Law Gino Nicolas Pauselli F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM Do legal rules really affect international politics? This course explores why international law has the form and content it does, and its role in shaping how states and other actors behave. It combines law and social science to examine important issues of the day, including security policies, human rights, and economic relationships. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 358-404 International Law Gino Nicolas Pauselli F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM Do legal rules really affect international politics? This course explores why international law has the form and content it does, and its role in shaping how states and other actors behave. It combines law and social science to examine important issues of the day, including security policies, human rights, and economic relationships. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 358-405 International Law Rachel Ann Hulvey R 05:00 PM-06:00 PM Do legal rules really affect international politics? This course explores why international law has the form and content it does, and its role in shaping how states and other actors behave. It combines law and social science to examine important issues of the day, including security policies, human rights, and economic relationships. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 358-406 International Law Rachel Ann Hulvey F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM Do legal rules really affect international politics? This course explores why international law has the form and content it does, and its role in shaping how states and other actors behave. It combines law and social science to examine important issues of the day, including security policies, human rights, and economic relationships. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 358-407 International Law Rachel Ann Hulvey R 01:30 PM-02:30 PM Do legal rules really affect international politics? This course explores why international law has the form and content it does, and its role in shaping how states and other actors behave. It combines law and social science to examine important issues of the day, including security policies, human rights, and economic relationships. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 395-301 Power-Sharing in Deeply Divided Places Brendan O'leary W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This course examines conceptual, explanatory and normative debates over power-sharing systems. We explore the circumstances in which federal, consociational and other power-sharing institutions and practices are proposed and implemented to regulate deep national, ethnic, religious or linguistic divisions. We evaluate these systems, seeking to explain why they are formed or attempted, and why they may endure or fail, paying special attention to bi- and multi-national, multi-ethnic, multi-religious and multi-lingual environments. Cross Cultural Analysis Benjamin Franklin Seminars
PSCI 398-301 Selected Topics Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one course may be taken in a given semester. Recent titles have included: Sustainable Environmental Policy & Global Politics; Shakespeare and Political Theory. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 398-302 Selected Topics Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one course may be taken in a given semester. Recent titles have included: Sustainable Environmental Policy & Global Politics; Shakespeare and Political Theory. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 398-303 Philadelphia: Power, Space and Diversity Michael A Jones-Correa T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one course may be taken in a given semester. Recent titles have included: Sustainable Environmental Policy & Global Politics; Shakespeare and Political Theory.
PSCI 398-304 Transnational Boycotts: Bds in Historical and Comparative Perspective Ian Steven Lustick R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one course may be taken in a given semester. Recent titles have included: Sustainable Environmental Policy & Global Politics; Shakespeare and Political Theory. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSCI 404-401 Media and Politics Diana C Mutz R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Media and Politics will examine multiple issues specific to the past and present political media environment in the United States. Focus will be primarily, though not exclusively, on the contemporary news media. Topics covered will include political primaries, how elections have been influenced by the rise of partisan media, selective exposure, freedom of political speech as it relates to elections, the theoretical purpose of elections, money and media, political targeting, etc. We will also explore the quantitative and qualitative methods underlying what is and is not known about how elections work. Reading expectations will be relatively heavy, and under the supervision of the professor, students will write an original research paper examining a specific topic in greater depth. COMM404401
PSCI 433-401 Social Movements Daniel Q Gillion R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Social movements and political protest have become some of the most effective tools for citizens and non-citizens to influence the political system. This course is designed to introduce students to the theoretical and methodological approaches taken in understanding these behaviors. Analyzing social movements that range from civil discontent to contentious political protest, the course will address a variety of questions: What is the origin of movement behavior and why do individuals turn to these actions in lieu of simply engaging in institutional modes of political action such as voting? What were the strategies of these movements? What are the political conditions that allow social movements to resonate with the American public? In addition to addressing these topics, this course surveys the policy successes of major social and political movements. From the Civil Rights and Women's Right Movement to the recent Tea Party movement and Hong Kong demonstrations over democracy, this course explores the various public policies that have resulted from citizens' protest actions. While state level and local level government responsiveness will be addressed, special attention will be given to how political protest influences public policy in all three branches of the federal government. AFRC433401
PSCI 437-401 Race & Criminal Justice Marie Gottschalk T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Why are African Americans and some other minority groups disproportionately incarcerated and subjected to penal sanctions? What are the political, social and economic consequences for individuals, communities, and the wider society of mass incarceration in the United States? What types of reforms of the criminal justice system are desirable and possible? This advanced seminar analyzes the connection between race, crime, punishment, and politics in the United States. The primary focus is on the role of race in explaining why the country's prison population increased six-fold since the early 1970s and why the United States today has the highest incarceration rate in the world. The class will likely take field trips to a maximum-security jail in Philadelphia and to a state prison in the Philadelphia suburbs. PSCI638401, AFRC437401, AFRC638401
PSCI 497-301 Political Science Honors Eileen Doherty-Sil M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This is a mandatory seminar for all students planning to submit an honors thesis for the purpose of possibly earning distinction in Political Science upon graduation. The course is aimed at helping students identify a useful and feasible research question, become familiar with the relevant literatures and debates pertaining to that question, develop a basic understanding of what might constitute "good" and "original" research in different subfields, and set up a plan for conducting and presenting the research. The course is also aimed at building a community of like-minded student researchers, which can complement and enrich the honor student's individual experience of working one-on-one with a dedicated faculty thesis advisor. Students apply in the spring of their junior year for admissions to the honors program and enrollment in PSCI497. Permission Needed From Instructor
PSCI 531-301 Public Opinion&Elections Matthew Levendusky T 08:00 AM-11:00 AM This course is designed to give advanced undergraduates and graduate students exposure to the literature on political behavior in American politics (the course is part of the departments 3-course graduate sequence in American politics). The course will cover both the classics of public opinion and political behavior from the Columbia, Michigan, and Rochester schools, as well as more current topics and debates in the literature. Topics include (but are not limited to) the early voting studies, the role of partisanship, the nature and origins of ideology, mass-elite interactions, heuristics and low information rationality, the nature of the survey response, campaign and media effects, framing effects, and the role of institutions in structuring behavior. Undergraduates are welcome in the class, but they should know that the class assumes familiarity with quantitative approaches to studying politics. Undergraduates Need Permission
PSCI 535-401 Inequality & Race Policy Daniel Q Gillion T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM AFRC524401 Undergraduates Need Permission
PSCI 558-640 Global Human Rights Eileen Doherty-Sil M 05:30 PM-08:10 PM This course will examine the theoretical, historical and political foundations of contemporary human rights debates. The course will cover not only broad conceptual issues, but also specific issue areas (e.g., civil rights, economic rights, women's rights, business and human rights), as well as the question of how new rights norms emerge and diffuse in the international arena. The course is open to students in the Master of Liberal Arts Program, as well as students who are actively pursuing the Graduate Certificate in Interdisciplinary Studies in Global Human Rights. Undergraduates Need Permission
PSCI 598-301 Authoritarian Politics Yue Hou W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one course may be taken in a given semester. Recent titles have included: Race Development and American International Relations, Hegel and Marx, and Logic of the West. Undergraduates Need Permission
PSCI 598-302 Evolving Perspectives in Comparative Politics Rudra Sil T 04:30 PM-07:30 PM Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one course may be taken in a given semester. Recent titles have included: Race Development and American International Relations, Hegel and Marx, and Logic of the West. Undergraduates Need Permission
PSCI 600-301 Intl Relations Theory Alexander R Weisiger R 09:00 AM-12:00 PM This purpose of this course is two-fold. First, the survey course is designed to introduce students to a wide range of theories of international politics. During the course of the semester we will examine neo-realism, power transition theory, hegemonic stability theory, the modern world system, international regimes and interdependence, the democratic peace, bureaucratic politics, organizational theory, constructivism, and decision making theory. Second, the course will sharpen students' research design skills. The written assignments require students to take the often abstract theories presented in the readings and develop practical research designs for testing hypotheses derived from the theories. The papers will not include data collection or the execution of actual tests. Rather, they will focus on the conceptual problems of designing tests which eliminate competing hypotheses, operationalizing variables, and identifying potential sources of data. Student's grades will be based on five short research designs and discussion leadership. Undergraduates Need Permission
PSCI 612-401 Tpcs in Blk Poli Thought Michael G. Hanchard W 10:00 AM-01:00 PM This course is designed to familiarize graduate students with some of the key texts and debates in Africana Studies concerning the relationship between racial slavery, modernity and politics. Beginning with the Haitian Revolution, much of black political thought (thinking and doing politics) has advocated group solidarity and cohesion in the face of often overwhelming conditions of servitude, enslavement and coercion within the political economy of slavery and the moral economy of white supremacy. Ideas and practices of freedom however, articulated by political actors and intellectuals alike, have been as varied as the routes to freedom itself. Thus, ideas and practices of liberty, citizenship and political community within many African and Afro-descendant communities have revealed multiple, often competing forms of political imagination. The multiple and varied forms of political imagination, represented in the writings of thinkers like Eric Williams, Richard Wright, Carole Boyce Davies and others, complicates any understanding of black political thought as having a single origin, genealogy or objective. Students will engage these and other authors in an effort to track black political thought's consonance and dissonance with Western feminisms, Marxism, nationalism and related phenomena and ideologies of the 20th and now 21st century. AFRC655401, GSWS655401, LALS656401 Undergraduates Need Permission
PSCI 618-301 Intl Political Economy Edward D Mansfield T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Examination of the relationship between the international, political, and economic systems from a variety of theoretical perspectives that have emerged in the postwar period, including liberalism, transnationalism, statism, Marxism, and dependency. Undergraduates Need Permission
PSCI 638-401 Race & Criminal Justice Marie Gottschalk T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM PSCI437401, AFRC437401, AFRC638401 Undergraduates Need Permission
PSCI 692-301 Stats For Public Policy Dorothy J Kronick M 09:00 AM-12:00 PM
W 01:00 PM-02:00 PM
Undergraduates Need Permission
PSCI 696-301 Qualitative Methods Julia F Lynch F 09:00 AM-12:00 PM Undergraduates Need Permission
PSCI 798-301 Applied Statistics III Daniel Jacob Hopkins TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one section may be given in a semester. Recent titles have included: Interpreting the Canon; State, Self, & Society; U.S. Policy in Europe; and Dissertation Writing. Undergraduates Need Permission
PSCI 798-302 Politics Power & Affect Roxanne L Euben T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one section may be given in a semester. Recent titles have included: Interpreting the Canon; State, Self, & Society; U.S. Policy in Europe; and Dissertation Writing. Undergraduates Need Permission
PSCI 798-303 Topics in Ir Edward D Mansfield T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one section may be given in a semester. Recent titles have included: Interpreting the Canon; State, Self, & Society; U.S. Policy in Europe; and Dissertation Writing. Undergraduates Need Permission
PSCI 798-304 Scope and Methods Dawn L Teele R 03:00 PM-06:00 PM Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one section may be given in a semester. Recent titles have included: Interpreting the Canon; State, Self, & Society; U.S. Policy in Europe; and Dissertation Writing. Undergraduates Need Permission
PSCI 798-305 Middle East Politics Robert Vitalis M 05:00 PM-08:00 PM Consult department for detailed descriptions. More than one section may be given in a semester. Recent titles have included: Interpreting the Canon; State, Self, & Society; U.S. Policy in Europe; and Dissertation Writing. Undergraduates Need Permission